Authors

  • ALLEMAND Denis

    Denis ALLEMAND is a Monegasque researcher specialized in Comparative Physiology and Biodiversity. He was born on July 9, 1959 in Monaco. He obtained his doctorate in 1986 at the University of Montpellier II in pharmacological sciences and endocrinology. He is a University Professor of Animal Biology. From 1998 to 2008, he founded and directed a research group at the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis on molecular interactions within marine symbioses and was for 4 years deputy director of the INRA - UNS Joint Research Unit "Responses of Organizations to Environmental Stress" (80 people). Since 1989, he has also been developing a research programme within the Centre Scientifique de Monaco (CSM)of which he has been Scientific Director since 2001. This Monegasque organization dedicated to scientific research brings together some sixty researchers, technical and administrative staff in three departments: a Marine Biology Department, a Polar Biology Department and a Medical Biology Department. His main field of research concerns the comparative physiology of marine organisms, mainly corals (reef-building corals, red coral, gorgonians...). He is co-author of more than 140 scientific articles and numerous book chapters. He supervised 12 doctoral students. He is a member of various boards: - Scientific Council of the Albert I - Prince of Monaco Foundation Oceanographic Institute, - Scientific and Technical Council of the Prince Albert II Foundation, - Scientific Council of the École Pratique des Hautes Études (EPHE), - IFREMER Scientific Council, - Board of Directors of the Oceanological Observatory of Villefranche-sur-Mer. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

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  • ANCEY Christophe

    Christophe Ancey is a doctor of engineering with degrees from the École Centrale de Paris and the École Nationale Supérieure d'Hydraulique et de Mécanique de Grenoble. He completed his thesis on the rheology of granular flows under the supervision of Pierre Evesque and Philippe Coussot from 1994 to 1997: he worked from 1998 to 2003 as a research fellow (rheology) at Cemagref within the "erosion protection" team, which has since become the "Torrential Erosion, Snow and Avalanches" laboratory at IRSTEA. Since 2003, he has been professor of fluid mechanics at EPFL and heads the Laboratoire d'Hydraulique Environnement. He conducts research on granular suspension flows and particle transport. In parallel, he created with Claude Charlier and Vincent bain a consulting structure (Toraval) for paravalanche engineering and torrential hydraulics, which offered him a vast field of applications to his theoretical developments. Finally, he is associate editor for Water Resources Research and Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, two flagship journals in the field of water sciences.

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  • ARNAUD Fabien

    Fabien Arnaud is a research director at the CNRS, assigned to the EDYTEM laboratory (Environnement DYnamique et TErritoire de la Montagne). He is working to reconstruct the past climate and environment from sediment cores collected mainly from lakes. In order to understand past variations, he uses sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological methods.

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  • AUBERT Serge

    Serge Aubert (1966-2015) was Professor at the Joseph Fourier University, Director of the Joseph Fourier Alpine Station and researcher at the Alpine Ecology Laboratory (LECA). His initial training in plant cell physiology was confirmed by a thesis on the metabolism of non-chlorophyll plant cells at the Laboratory of Cell and Plant Physiology (LPCV) in Grenoble. Little by little, his work is oriented towards the response of alpine plants to the various stresses they face. He joined the LECA (Laboratory of Alpine Ecology) in 2003, and collaborates in numerous research programs on the diversity of alpine plants. More recently, he had been involved in large projects dealing with the geographical distribution of high-altitude plants, in particular compact plants called pillow plants, for which he had become the undisputed specialist. Serge Aubert will be at the origin of the creation in 2005 of the mixed service unit Station Alpine J. Fourier (UMS UJF-CNRS), of which he will ensure the continuous management.

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  • AUGER Pierre

    Pierre Auger is Research Director at the Research Institute for Development at the UMMISCO International Joint Unit, Mathematical Modelling and Complex Systems Informatics Unit, which he headed from 2009 to 2013. Pierre Auger is a specialist in mathematical modelling in population dynamics. He has contributed to the methods of dimension reduction in dynamic systems that he has implemented in population dynamics. He worked on fisheries modelling in collaboration with INRH (Institut National de Recherche Halieutique) in Morocco from 2008 to 2012, and with CRODT (Centre de Recherche Océanographique de Dakar-Thiaroye) in Senegal from 2012 to 2017 where he was assigned by his research institute, IRD. Pierre Auger has also worked on modelling the population dynamics of large mammals in Kenya in collaboration with the African Conservation Center in Nairobi. Pierre Auger has been a member of the Academy of Sciences since 2003. He is the author of a popularization book on mathematical modelling in ecology (Dunod, 2010).

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  • AUGER-ROZENBERG Marie-Anne

    Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg is Research Director in the Forest Zoology Unit of the INRA. Trained as a biologist, she turned to the genetics of seed and cone insects after her recruitment. She mainly develops research on the integrative taxonomy and genetics of invasive and expanding forest insect populations under the influence of anthropogenic changes. In this context, she is working on the study of genetic tracing of invasion pathways, taking into account the processes involved in the arrival and installation of invasives in relation to the topology of commercial networks.

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  • BAKALOWICZ Michel

    Michel Bakalowicz is a Doctor of Natural Sciences, University of Paris-6, after a postgraduate doctorate in karst hydrogeology from Taurus, Turkey. He worked at CEMAGREF, in the Hydrology Division (1971-1972). Then he completed his thesis on the contributions of geochemistry and isotopes to the understanding of the genesis and functioning of karst aquifers under the direction of Bernard Gèze and René Létolle from 1972 to 1979, at the CNRS Underground Laboratory in Moulis, Ariège. He was then seconded to Mac Master University, Hamilton, Ontario, to study underground paleoenvironments using isotopes and U/Th radiochronology (1981-1982). The methodological developments to which he contributed led him to act as a scientific referent of karst in numerous studies applied for BRGM and the Ministries of the Environment and Cultural Affairs (1983-1994). He was made available to BRGM as a scientific advisor when the Hydrogeology of Heterogeneous Environments Unit was created in Montpellier to develop research in karst hydrogeology (1995-2004). Finally, as part of the cooperation with Lebanon, he is seconded to the IRD to manage the Regional Water and Environment Centre of the Beirut Higher School of Engineering (2004-2008), where he is in charge of teaching, supervising theses and leading regional research programmes. From 1995 to 2008, it was attached to the HydroSciences Montpellier Laboratory laboratoire HydroSciences Montpellier. He has been a lecturer in karst hydrogeology and water geochemistry at the universities of Paris-6, Toulouse, Avignon, Montpellier and Beirut. He has also been an expert with the IAEA to lead and evaluate projects on karst water resources in Haiti, Morocco, Algeria, Syria and Lebanon and has led scientific cooperation projects in China.

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  • BALLANDRAS-ROZET Christelle

    Christelle Ballandras-Rozet defended her doctoral thesis in Environmental Law in 2005, on the theme: "Conventional techniques for combating pollution and nuisances and preventing technological risks". Since then, she has continued her research in public law and environmental law, having recently published the following articles: "Regards croisés sur l'équilibre en finances publiques et en droit de l'environnement", 2017; "Quelle efficativité pour les référés-environnement ?", RJE 2-2016; Commentary on the CAA judgment in Lyon, 4 June 2015, Commune de Toulouse, n°14LY00058, ALYODA, December 2015. It also participates in collective research leading to publications, such as the drafting, in 2017, of a methodological guide on "CSR, Dynamics of negotiation and compromise in the context of technological risk activities" (research contract between the FonCSi Foundation for a Culture of Industrial Security and the Jean Moulin Lyon 3 University). It is part of the Institute of Environmental Law of the University Jean Moulin Lyon 3.

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  • BALSAMO Gianpaolo

    Gianpaolo Balsamo was born in Turin, where he studied until his master's degree in atmospheric physics. His professional approach as a meteorological forecaster at the Regional Service of Piedmont in Italy has stimulated his interest in research, starting in 2000 as a young researcher in the Modelling and Assimilation Group for Forecasting (GMAP) of the National Meteorological Research Centre (CNRM) of Météo-France, and continuing in 2004 in the Research Team in Numerical Forecasting (RPN) of the Canadian Environmental Metrology Service. Since 2006 he has been working as a surface modelling manager at the European Centre for Medium-Range Meteorological Forecasting (ECMWF), with the position of team leader since 2016.

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  • BARRAQUE Bernard

    Bernard Barraqué, a mining civil engineer and Harvard graduate urban planner, worked first as an urban environment consultant and then increasingly as a researcher and teacher. Recruited to the CNRS in 1988 as an interdisciplinary department in architecture, urban planning and society, he worked 19 years at the Laboratoire Techniques Territoires et Sociétés (LATTS) before joining the CIRED, where he is now Director of Emeritus Research. It analyses in a comparative and historical way, in Europe and in some emerging countries, the reasonable and equitable sharing of water resources, the sustainable management of public water and sanitation services, and the link between the two. His latest project, Water&3E, was funded by the ANR Ville durable, and left a blog available: http://eau3e.hypotheses.org. He is currently reflecting on the nature of water as a common good, and on the history of economics, law, and related public policies.

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  • BARRÉ Bertrand

    BertrandBARRÉ is retired from the CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives), and AREVA, and is Professor Emeritus at the Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucléaires (INSTN), and a teacher in several Grandes Ecoles, including Sciences-Po/PSIA.

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  • BAUDIN François

    Doctor of Geosciences (1989), François BAUDIN became a professor after ten years as a research fellow at the CNRS. He teaches sedimentology and petroleum geology at Sorbonne University (ex Univ. Paris 06-UPMC), and is part of the ISTeP laboratory. The main thrust of his work is to understand the processes that control the preservation and distribution of organic matter in current and fossil sediments. His work has been awarded the Cayeux Prizes of the Academy of Sciences (1993), the Bronze Medal of the CNRS (1999), the Tissot Prize of the Academy of Sciences (2007) and the Dumont Medal of the Geologica Belgica Society (2017). Head of the Evolution and Modelling of Sedimentary Basins team within his research unit (2006-2013), he was deputy director and then director of the Research Federation 32 CEPAGE (1999-2006), head of the Licence Sciences Terre at the UPMC (2000-2006) and then director of the École Doctorale 398 "Géosciences, ressources naturelles, environnements" (2007-2016). He was a member of the SVT Capes jury (2010-2013) and has been a member of the SVTU Aggregation jury since 2017. He has also been Vice-President of the Société géologique de France since 2016.

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  • BELORIZKY Elie

    Elie Belorizky was Professor of Physics at Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble where he was appointed after a post-doctoral stay at Oxford University. A condensed matter theorist, he specialized in problems of magnetism, Paramagnetic Electronic Resonance (PER) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in liquids. He is a scientific collaborator at the Interdisciplinary Laboratory of Physics (LIPhy) of the University of Grenoble-Alpes (UGA) and scientific advisor to the CEA Grenoble at the Direction de la Recherche Technologique (DRT) where he carries out work on medical imaging by NMR. He is the author of more than a hundred articles published in international scientific journals. He has taught in all cycles of higher education from the first year of his bachelor's degree to the preparation for the agrégation de physique exam and has given numerous courses in doctoral schools. He has contributed to the creation of several courses (bachelor's degree, master's degree, master's degree). He has also written several books on Quantum Mechanics, Statistical Physics, Mathematics for scientists and engineers and is co-author of more specialized books on EPR, and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging).

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  • BENISTON Martin

    Martin Beniston completed his university studies in England and his doctoral thesis in Paris and finally his Habilitation at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. He has worked in climate research in Australia, France, Canada, Germany and Switzerland. From 1993-1996 he divided his time between climate research at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH-Zurich) and vice-chairmanship of the "Impacts" group of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) before being appointed professor at the University of Fribourg, where he headed the Institute of Geography. In 2006, he moved to the University of Geneva as professor and director of the Institute of Environmental Sciences. Among the many projects he has led, the major European project ACQWA (www.acqwa.ch) on water resources in a changing climate. He has nearly 200 scientific publications to his credit and, in 2000, was elected a member of the European Academy of Sciences (Academia Europea).

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  • BEREST Pierre

    Graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique in 1973 and the Ecole des Mines de Paris in 1976, doctor of engineering from the Ecole des Mines de Paris. From 1981 to 2017, researcher at the Laboratoire de mécanique des solides at the Ecole Polytechnique, which he directed from 1990 to 2001. Associate Professor of Continuous Media Mechanics at the Ecole Polytechnique from 1989 to 2000. Scientific adviser in the Department of Engineering Sciences at the CNRS from 1998 to 1997. Chairman of the Scientific Council of the LCPC from 1998 to 2006. Expert at the Scientific Council of IFPen. Member of the Editorial Committee of the Oil & Gas Science and Technology Review. Author or co-author of 200 articles (Reviews or Conference Proceedings) in the fields of plasticity, visco-plasticity, stability, thermomechanics, thermodynamics applied to underground structures, mines, tunnels, gas, oil or radioactive waste storage. Grand Prix du Gaz de France awarded by the Académie des Sciences in 1999. Chairman of the Permanent Waste Group at the Nuclear Safety Authority. Member (liaison) of the International Geomechanical Commission on underground nuclear testing in French Polynesia (1988-1999), Chairman of the Steering Committee set up after the fire in Stocamine (2001); member of the Blue Ribbon Commission to the State of Louisiana after the collapse of Bayou Corne (2013-2014). President of the Solution Mining Research Institute in 2011.

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  • BLIGNY Richard

    Richard BLIGNY is retired Research Director of the CNRS. Its activity took place at the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale (LPCV) of CEA-Grenoble (Joint Unit CNRS, CEA, INra and Université Grenoble Alpes) and focused mainly on studying the role of metals, carbonaceous nutrition and the response to various deficiencies in plant cells. The study of carbon stress led him to propose and develop the concept of autophagy in plants and to analyse certain aspects of their energy metabolism, particularly with regard to the renewal of ATP. In order to carry out physiological and biochemical analyses that disturb cellular functioning as little as possible, he made extensive use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in vivo, helping to develop this technique, and in 1989 he created a laboratory at the Col du Lautaret to study the functioning of mountain plants and their ecology. From 2000 to 2005, he managed the Joseph Fourier alpine station in Lautaret, which brings together this laboratory and a century-old alpine garden open to the general public.

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  • BLONDEL Jacques

    Jacques Blondel is Director of Research Emeritus CNRS at Centre d'Écologie Fonctionnelle et Évolutive (CEFE) de Montpellier... Since the beginning of his career, he has been interested in the mechanisms of regulating biological diversity in space and time, and has developed a nested approach to research on the scale of fauna, species assemblages and populations, using the Mediterranean area as a field of investigation and birds as a study model. The remarkable heterogeneity of Mediterranean landscapes has led him to analyse in detail the mechanisms of adaptation to habitat diversity, developing within the research team he has created integrated approaches combining demography, genetics, evolutionary ecophysiology and ethology. In particular, he focused on the respective roles of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation by microevolution in the analysis of responses to selection regimes induced by different habitat conditions as well as by several components of global change. Author of nearly 350 articles and 7 books, he has also been involved in current issues related to biodiversity (he was president of the Scientific Council of the French Institute of Biodiversity) and relations between humans and non-humans, which he developed in a book L'archipel de la Vie, an essay on biological diversity and an ethics of its practice (Buchet-Chastel, 2012).

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  • BOUGEAULT Philippe

    Philippe Bougeault's career has been devoted to research in weather forecasting, numerical modelling and field measurement campaigns. He headed the Research Department of the European Centre for Medium-Range Meteorological Forecasts (Reading), then the National Centre for Meteorological Research (Toulouse). He is currently scientific advisor to the President of Météo-France.

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  • BOULON Marc

    Marc Boulon was professor and then professor emeritus at the Joseph Fourier University, now Grenoble Alpes University, where he spent his career. He has taught aspects of mechanics (rational, material resistance, soils, rocks, numerical modelling), co-organized advanced training courses for geotechnical engineers. His research, at Laboratoire 3SR, often in partnership with French or foreign laboratories, focused on hydro-mechanical constitutive and numerical modelling, applied to structures involving static or cyclic contact between geo-materials. In particular, pile foundations, rock-dam contact, tunnels, underground storage containment are treated. He has supervised nearly 50 theses, published about 100 articles in international scientific journals, presented numerous papers at international conferences, and has himself organized international conferences. He co-produced the monograph "Mechanics of Geomaterial Interfaces", he is a member of French and foreign learned societies.

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  • BOURDEAU Céline

    Engineer of the École de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg (2000) and Doctor of Geology of the École des Mines de Paris (2005), I focused my research on the theme of ground movements triggered by earthquakes. Using a numerical modelling approach (mainly finite differences), I analyse the causes behind the onset of this type of instability. I am now a research fellow at IFSTTAR.

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  • BOUSSAC Alain

    Alain Boussac, CNRS Research Director, is interested in the structural-functional relationships within the photosystem II (PS II) of chloroplasts, an essential complex for photosynthesis. understanding all the stages of the photosynthetic process from protein to the cell and then to the entire organism is crucial to addressing the problems associated with environmental change through the development of effective bio-inspired artificial systems in the production of carbon-free energy. The project of the team led by Alain Boussac consists in characterizing and understanding the stage of the reaction mechanism in which water is oxidized. The project involves biological, spectroscopic (mainly Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance) and thermodynamic approaches. Overall, this involves combining enzymology and spectroscopy with the production of modified enzymes either by directed mutagenesis or by biosynthetic or biochemical means. The project also involves collaborations with several laboratories, some of which are foreign, among the best in their field. The ultimate goal is to make a significant contribution to the field of bioenergy. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

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  • BOUTTIER François

    François Bouttier is General Engineer of Bridges, Waters and Forests, assigned to the CNRM (Centre National de Recherches Météo-France et du CNRS). Among other work, he developed improvements to the forecasting system of the European Centre for Medium-Range Meteorological Forecasts (ECMWF), led the development of the AROME forecast model for Météo-France, and designed the AROME ensemble forecast system.

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  • BREGLIANO Jean-Claude

    Jean-Claude Bregliano is an honorary university professor. He began his university career in Orsay in 1960. In 1967, he left with Philippe L'Héritier to Clermont-Ferrand to found the Laboratoire de Génétique de l'Université Blaise Pascal and a course in Genetics. He took over the management of the company in 1973. This laboratory will discover in the Drosophila and for the first time in the animal kingdom, a family of transposable elements. He leads the grouping of isolated teams of young biologists, which led to the creation in 1983 of an Associate Research Unit at the CNRS, the direction of which he shares with Jean-Pierre Dufaure. In 1990, he moved to Marseille-Luminy where he created a genetic team within the Institute of Developmental Biology. This team showed, for the first time in a metazoan in toto, that moderate doses of gamma irradiation stimulate homologous recombination. An effect subject to transient epigenetic transmission. From 1995 to 2000, J-C Bregliano directed the doctoral training in Cellular Biology, Structural Biology and Microbiology, which included a large number of laboratories in PACA. In addition to the publications of his laboratories, he is co-author of a chapter in the book "Mobile Genetic Elements" published by the Acad Press in 1983, as well as 3 articles in the Encyclopædia Universalis. He is the author of the blog www.lespiedsdansleplat.me

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  • BREYTON Cécile

    Doctor in Cellular and Molecular Biology (1997), Cécile Breyton is Research Director at the CNRS. Her scientific career has taken her successively to the Institute of Physical and Chemical Biology (Paris), the Max-Planck Institute für Biophysik (Frankfurt) and the Institute of Structural Biology (Grenoble) where she has been in charge of a team since 2016 and Deputy Director since 2017. The main focus of his work is the study of the stability of the structure of membrane proteins. In particular, she determined the role of delipidation in the inactivation of membrane proteins manipulated in detergent solution and determined by electronic crystallography the first structure of the translocon, a ubiquitous protein in living organisms that allows certain proteins to pass through the membranes. She then focused on the development of new fluorinated surfactants to manipulate membrane proteins in solution. In recent years, she has been particularly interested in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of bacterial wall perforation by phages during the early stages of bacterial infection by phages, the viruses that attack them.

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  • BRIANÇON Laurent

    Laurent Briançon is a lecturer at the SMS-ID laboratory since 2014. Lecturer at the Conservatory of Arts and Crafts from 2003 to 2012, he is confronted with the future problems of the engineering students he trains and becomes project director in the Antea group design office. Laurent Briançon is conducting experimental and partnership research in the field of soil reinforcement and geosynthetics. He was heavily involved in the national ASIRI (Soil Improvement by Rigid Inclusions) project from 2005 to 2012 and participated in other research projects in the field of soil reinforcement (Rufex, GeoInov). It collaborates with university specialists in numerical modelling to propose complete solutions combining experimentation and modelling. Laurent Briançon was one of the curators of the exhibition "Les dessous de grands travaux" at the Musée des arts et métiers (2013 - 2018). Director of LabCom PITAGOR (Platform for Technological Innovations Applied to Geosynthetics of Reinforced Structures) since 2015, he has been pursuing his activity by developing laboratory experiments and proposing geotechnical auscultations of real structures.

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  • BRIAT Jean-François

    Jean-François Briat is Honorary Research Director at the CNRS. An agricultural engineer at ENITA in Bordeaux and a doctor of state in cellular and molecular biology (UJF Grenoble), he began his research in Professor Mache's laboratory at UJF on the study of the structure and functioning of the transcription apparatus for plant chloroplasts. He then contributed to the analysis of prokaryotic transcription systems in Professor Chamberlin's laboratory at the University of Berkeley. Back in Grenoble, he began studying iron metabolism in higher plants. The first part of this study concerns ferritins, proteins that store iron in a soluble, bio-usable and non-toxic form. This work has greatly contributed to defining the concept of biofortification used today by many laboratories to increase the amount of iron in genetically modified plants. In a second step, he undertook the analysis of iron deficiency and transport of this metal, by creating an ATIPE team from the CNRS in Montpellier, in the laboratory of Prof. Grignon (currently laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Physiology of Plants, B&PMP). During this new phase two major molecular breakthroughs were made by characterizing the iron transport systems of the plant kingdom. Some of this fundamental research work has been transferred to more applied INRA research laboratories, making it possible to: (i) test different hypotheses of plant biofortification to improve animal and/or human diets, and (ii) measure the impact of changes in iron homeostasis in plants on the biodiversity of microbial communities in the rhizosphere. Elected corresponding member of the Académie d'Agriculture de France in 2015, he headed the Plant Biology department of INRA from 1999 to 2002 and the Biochemistry and Molecular Physiology of Plants UMR in Montpellier from 2007 to 2012.

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  • BROUQUISSE Renaud

    After studying biochemistry (Biochemistry Engineer, INSA Lyon, 1984) and microbiology (DEA in soil microbiology, University of Lyon II, 1984), Renaud Brouquisse completed a doctorate in plant biology in the Laboratory of Cellular Plant Physiology (CENG-CEA, University of Grenoble, 1987). After a post-doctoral internship at East Lansing (University of Michigan, 1987-88), he joined INRA in 1989 and developed research on the response of plants to abiotic constraints (carbon deficiency, hypoxia, heavy metals) at the Plant Physiology Station in Villenave d'Ornon (INRA Bordeaux) until 2004, then at the Laboratory of Cellular Plant Physiology (CEA, Grenoble). Since 2006, he has been part of the Cell's Symbiosis and Redox State team at the Sophia Agrobiotech Institute (INRA de Sophia Antipolis), where he conducts research on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the establishment and functioning of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in legumes, as well as on the adaptation of cultivated legumes to environmental constraints.

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  • CASSARD Anne-Marie

    Anne-Marie Cassard is a Research Fellow at the INSERM in the Inflammation, Chemokines&Immunopathology Unit, U996, at the University of Paris-Sud and attached to the Paris-Saclay University campus. The team she co-directs with G. Perlemuter, entitled Intestinal Microbiota, Macrophages et inflammation hépatique, is interested in the role of the intestinal microbiota in the susceptibility to develop liver damage during nutritional diseases and in particular in alcoholic liver disease and metabolic steatopathy (liver disease associated with overweight and obesity). The research team is supported by the Antoine-Béclère Hospital's hospital services, including the gastroenterology and nutrition department headed by Professor G. Perlemuter, which is a close collaboration between basic research and the clinic that promotes the emergence of translational research projects that aim to identify the bacteria or products manufactured by these bacteria involved in protecting against liver damage during alcohol consumption or in obese people. In 2016, A. M. Cassard co-authored with G. Perlemuter a book for the general public on the intestinal microbiota "the bacteria of friends who want you well", published by Solar. This book received the Science for the Best Popularization of Science Award in 2017.

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  • Julien Cattiaux has been a research fellow at the CNRS since 2014. He works at the Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques (CNRM), a laboratory based at the Météo-France site in Toulouse. It studies the effect of climate change on meteorological variability in general, including changes in atmospheric circulation and the evolution of extreme events.

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  • CAVALIN Catherine

    After an interdisciplinary training in social sciences and about ten years of teaching in economic and commercial preparatory classes, Catherine Cavalin coordinated the survey Life Events and Health (EVS) at the Directorate of Research, Studies, Evaluation and Statistics (DREES) of the Ministry of Health. This survey focuses on the relationship between violence suffered and health status, the subject of her doctoral thesis in sociology (defended in 2016). From 2009 to 2012, she worked on the relationship between health, work and employment at the Centre d'études de l'emploi et du travail. From 2012 to 2017, in the ERC SILICOSIS team (Centre d'études européennes de Sciences Po), Catherine Cavalin produced unpublished data, combining statistical sources (existing or built ad hoc) and qualitative survey materials, to shed light on correlations between working and living conditions and various unexplained chronic diseases. In 2017-2018, several publications (in social sciences and medicine) are to be published: on the etiology of diseases, on investigation methods and on the socio-environmental definition of the diseases studied (e. g. rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, systemic scleroderma). See: http://www.sciencespo.fr/silicosis/fr/la-page-d-accueil. Since September 2017, Catherine Cavalin has been a policy officer at the Human Rights Defender at IRISSO.

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  • CHAUVEL Bruno

    Bruno Chauvel is a researcher in the Environmental Agronomy Department of INRA. The overall objective of his work is to design and evaluate sustainable multi-species cropping systems based on integrated pest management to control weed populations. To do this, it seeks to identify the functional traits that allow weed species to succeed or become rare in the various current cropping systems and to understand the changes observed in populations (changes in emergence dates, herbicide resistance, etc.). He is also interested in the invasion processes in plots cultivated through the case of sagebrush ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.).

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  • CHAUVIN Fabrice

    Researcher since 2005, currently at CNRM (Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques), my main theme is the study of tropical cyclones and their sensitivity to climate change. To this end, I carry out high spatial resolution climate simulations that make it possible to represent these small-scale phenomena. I have previously discussed the study of Indian and African monsoons and mid-latitude storms in the North Atlantic.

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  • CHIU Victoria

    Victoria Chiu, from The Institut de Droit de l'Environnement, has been a lecturer in public law at the Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 since September 2015. Specialized in water law, she defended her doctoral thesis in November 2014, on "La protection de l'eau en droit public. Comparative study of Spanish, French and Italian law". Since then, she has published several articles and spoken at numerous conferences in France and abroad. Its scientific contribution consists more particularly in comparing national laws applicable to water, in order to build a reflection that goes beyond the limits of a single legal system.

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  • CORNET François Henri

    François Henri Cornet obtained a PhD from the University of Minnesota in "Mineral Engineering" and a PhD in physical sciences from the University of Paris 7. Most of his research career has been spent at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, where he headed the rock mechanics team at the seismology laboratory. His work has involved the measurement and study of stress fields in the earth's crust and fluid-rock interactions. He has participated in the development of high temperature geothermal energy but also in the study of deformations on volcanoes. Through various European programs he spent ten years developing the Corinth Rift Laboratory, which focused on the in situ study of fault mechanics. He joined the University of Strasbourg in 2007 where he developed the teaching of geomechanics. He is the author of more than 150 publications in various journals or conference proceedings and published in 2015 the textbook "Elements of Crustal Geomechanics" at Cambridge University Press.

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  • CORNIC Gabriel

    Gabriel Cornic was a professor at the laboratory of plant ecophysiology at the Faculty of Sciences of Orsay (University Paris Sud XI). His work has focused on photoinhibition, the rapid effects of water stress on foliar photosynthesis (including electron flows between IEHP and PSI) and the inhibition of respiration by light. He is currently still working in the plant ecophysiology laboratory where his three areas of interest have been: the study of cyclic electron flows around PSI in plants suffering from drought, the examination of the regulation of PTO (plastidial terminal oxidase) in alpine plants and the inhibition of respiration by light.

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  • COURTIAL Lucile

    Lucile Courtial is a biologist specializing in the relationships between organisms and their environment. She is currently completing a PhD on the combined effects of UVs and global warming on Scleractinian corals at Centre Scientifique de Monaco. A graduate of the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris, this young researcher is passionate about the ocean. Her passion comes from her childhood during which she lived 4 years on the island of Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. Sent by coral reefs, she decided to learn more about corals through her studies and many trips. Her interest led her to follow long internships at the Institute of Marine Science in Townsville, Australia; at the University of Reunion Island and to work at the IRD in Nouméa, New Caledonia, during her PhD. Today, it wants to use its knowledge and skills to serve the environment in order to limit anthropogenic impacts on the oceans and protect them.

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  • COURTIN-NOMADE Alexandra

    Alexandra Courtin-Nomade is Professor of Geosciences at the University of Limoges, assigned to the PEIRENE laboratory axis 3-GRESE. His work is devoted to the study of metal contamination in the critical area within solid compartments (rocks, soils, sediments) using crystallochemistry, mineralogy and geochemistry tools. It is particularly interested in products generated by mining and industrial activities (waste rock, slag). Within the framework of the GRQE Chair (Large Retainments and Water Quality), for which she coordinates the "sediments" axis, she is interested in the roles of dams on sediment continuity as well as their role as sediment reservoirs, sediments that can be both a trap and a source of contaminants. This work involves knowledge of sediment mineralogy and the study of processes at interfaces.

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  • CUNY Damien

    Damien Cuny is an ecotoxicologist and Professor at the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Lille. He belongs to the environmental biomonitoring group within the IMPECS team: Impacts of the Chemical Environment on Human Health. His work focuses on biomonitoring air quality (outdoor and indoor) through the use of lichens and higher plants. The objective of its work is to assess the risks that air pollution poses to the environment and health. Its results are used in particular in the context of a Geographic Information System specifically set up by its group to study the links between health and the environment (SIGLE).

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  • DANCHIN Antoine

    Mathematician and physicist, Antoine Danchin immersed himself in experimental microbiology at the beginning of the 1970s. To understand the rules of gene organization in bacteria, he collaborated with artificial intelligence specialists in 1985. The success of this work convinced him that the time had come to explore genomes as totalities, with the help of a decisive effort in information science. As early as 1991, this led to a first discovery: half of the genes identified by sequencing in the genome of a model bacterium were totally unknown.

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  • DANEL Vincent

    Professor Emeritus, University of Grenoble Alpes (UGA). Professor of Toxicology (Pharmacy UFR, UGA). Hospital medical practitioner at Grenoble University Hospital . Head of the Clinical Toxicology Unit (Grenoble University Hospital) (1984 - 2006). Head of SAMU 38 Department (2007 - 2017). Specialist in Anesthesia-Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. Major part of career in clinical toxicology and toxicovigilance. Numerous publications and books in Toxicology. Numerous participations in expertise in the field with health agencies.

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  • DARVE Félix

    Félix Darve is an engineer from Ecole Centrale Paris and Doctor of Science from the University of Grenoble. He has directed the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d'Hydraulique et de Mécanique de Grenoble, the CNRS Coordinated Research Group "Géomatériaux", the network of European laboratories "ALERT Geomaterials" and was Deputy Director of the "Mechanics" Department of the Ministry in charge of Research. He is currently editor-in-chief of the International Journal for Numerical and AnalyticalMethods in Geomechanics, published by Wiley, and chairs various scientific committees, including the scientific council of the Auvergne-Rhône Alpes "Sustainable Infrastructure" cluster (INDURA). He also carries out expert work with various international organizations and is the director of the collection of books published by ISTE-Wiley and ISTE-Elsevier.

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  • DE LAAT Joseph

    After obtaining a Doctorate of State in Physical Sciences (1988) from the University of Poitiers, Joseph De Laat was appointed Lecturer at the IUT Chimie (University of Poitiers) where he taught process engineering. Professor at the University of Poitiers since 1994, he teaches chemistry and water treatment (urban and industrial wastewater, process water, drinking water) at l'Ecole Nationale Supérieure d'Ingénieurs de Poitiers (ENSIP). He was Director of the Water and Environment Specialty at ENSIP from 2003 to 2009 and then of the Water and Engineering Specialty at ENSIP from 2009 to 2014. Researcher at the Laboratory of Chemistry and Microbiology of Water (now IC2MP) since 1982, Joseph De Laat has studied the mechanisms and kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic compounds in aqueous media by oxidants conventionally used in water treatment (chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine) and by various advanced oxidation processes that generate highly reactive radical entities (hydroxyl radicals).

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  • DE MARSILY Ghislain

    Ghislain de Marsily, a civil mining engineer, passed his state thesis at Paris VI in 1978 and taught applied geology at the Ecole des Mines de Paris and then at the University of Paris VI. Its field of activity, mainly centred within the METIS (Environmental Environments, Transfers and Interactions in Hydrosystems and Soils) research unit, concerns groundwater, global water resources, their protection and management, the management of waste (nuclear, industrial or domestic) buried in the ground, and sustainable development for which water is a fundamental element, affected by climate change.He is the author of several hundred publications in major international scientific journals and several books, including Quantitative Hydrology (Masson, 1981), Flow and Tansport in FracturedRockes (Acad. Press, Orlando, 1993), Water (Flammarion, 1995, 2000), Water, a shared treasure (Dunod, 2009). His career has been rewarded with numerous prizes and high distinctions.

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  • DELAYGUE Gilles

    I work at Laboratory of glaciology and environmental geophysics on the reconstruction of past climates and climatic forcings using "archived" physico-chemical markers in sediments, mainly ice. These markers are natural isotopes, whose chemical behaviour, or isotopic fractionation due to their mass difference, is sensitive to climatic conditions ('isotope thermometer'), or to solar forcing (cosmogenic isotope production).

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  • DEQUE Michel

    In 1980, I entered the research centre of what would later become Météo-France, after studying at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole Nationale de la Météorologie. I participated in the development of the institution's successive climate simulation models. Ten years later, I was appointed head of the team responsible for promoting the climate model from the weather prediction model. My activity then diversified, through numerous international projects, towards the issues of regionalization of climate change and seasonal forecasting. In 2006, I supported an authorization to conduct research on this last theme. In 2016, I was appointed head of the team responsible for setting up and improving the seasonal forecasting system for Météo-France.

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  • DESPRÉS Laurence

    Laurence Després is a professor at the University of Grenoble Alpes (UGA) and conducts his research at Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA). She teaches evolutionary biology, ecology, adaptation genetics and molecular phylogeny, and is in charge of the Master of Biodiversity Ecology Evolution (BEE) at the UGA, Dynamics and Biodiversity Modeling (DynaMo). She is interested in the evolutionary ecology of sustainable interactions (host-parasite or host-mutualist) and co-evolution, adaptation genetics and speciation, particularly in insects. His work combines genetic approaches with ecological, biochemical or behavioural analyses to test hypotheses on the nature of constraints on natural (or experimental) populations and on the evolution of complex adaptive traits. His most recent work focuses on the evolution of cocktail resistance to toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) in mosquitoes, and on the diversification of butterflies along altitudinal gradients in the Alps. She is the author of more than 70 articles in peer-reviewed journals and three book chapters, and has supervised 8 doctoral students.

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  • DESROZIERS Gérald

    My career has been largely devoted to research in data assimilation within the framework of of numerical weather prediction. In particular, I participated in the implementation of a new generation of assimilation systems at Météo-France in 2000, then to the use of the assemblies in assimilation at the end of the 2000s. I am now coordinating the activities of a group of researchers in data assimilation.

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  • DEWANDEL Benoît

    Benoît Dewandel has been a researcher at BRGM since 2002. He obtained his PhD in 2002 from the University of Science and Technology of Montpellier on the basement aquifers of Oman. From 2002 to 2007, he was part of the Centre Franco-Indien de Recherche sur les Eaux Souterraines (CEFIRES), a joint laboratory between BRGM and the National Geophysical Research Institute (Hyderabad, Télangana, India) specializing in the hydrogeology of basement aquifers. Since 2007, he has been leading several R&D projects on complex aquifers (basement, volcanics) at BRGM in Montpellier. His main research work focuses on conceptualizing the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical functioning of complex aquifers, estimating their hydrodynamic parameters, including the development of appropriate mathematical solutions to model pump tests in these environments, the development of techniques for regionalizing these parameters, but also the development of decision support tools to improve the management of groundwater resources in basement aquifers. Together with his colleagues geologists and hydrogeologists, including Robert Wyns and Patrick Lachassagne, he contributed to the development of the modern concept of the stratiform basement aquifer and its validation in different countries or continents. His work has resulted in several scientific publications.

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  • DOUKI Thierry

    Thierry Douki is a researcher at the CEA within the SYMMES Laboratory (Molecular and nanomaterials SYstems for Energy and Health) of the Institut Nanosciences et Cryogénie (INAC), a federal research institute CEA-Université Grenoble Alpes. A chemist by training, he is interested in the formation and repair of DNA damage. His activities involve first of all the study of chemical mechanisms on isolated DNA or simple models. He also works at the cellular level through the development of sensitive and specific analytical tools, based in particular on mass spectrometry. He is interested in chemical genotoxic agents such as air pollutants, or physical agents such as ultraviolet radiation. In this field, he was particularly interested in the influence of the type of radiation on the nature of DNA damage. He is heavily involved in several photobiology societies and is an expert at ANSES.

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  • DOUVILLE Hervé

    Researcher at CNRM since 1995 on the theme of modelling and understanding natural climate variability and change in response to human activities, Hervé Douville is also a member of the LEFE/IMAGO scientific committee of the INSU responsible for coordinating work on interactions between the atmosphere, ice and ocean at the national level, and has been helping since 2018 to coordinate the drafting of a chapter dedicated to changes in the water cycle as part of the next report of the first IPCC working group (AR6 WG1).

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  • DOUZET Rolland

    Rolland Douzet is Associate Professor (PRAG) at the UGA since 1998 on a specific profile : (1) Teacher at the UFR of Chemistry-Biology - (2) Botanical manager and deputy director of the Joseph Fourier Alpine Station (SAJF), UGA/CNRS Joint Services Unit (UMS). He teaches botany and plant biology and supervises the CU of botany and plant ecology in Briançon. Within the SAJF, it sets up and manages a seed bank of more than 2,000 species (seed exchanges with more than 300 gardens around the world and with researchers). He has already carried out numerous missions for seed collection, plant collection and image bank building in many parts of the southern hemisphere: Patagonia, Chile, New Zealand, Australia. He is solicited for expert roles in research programs conducted at SAJF (plant determination, seed or sample collection, etc.) He is also involved in the writing of various books such as the Lautaret notebook: "Découverte botanique de la région du Lautaret et du Briançonnais" published in 2010.

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  • DROUET Emmanuel

    Emmanuel Drouet is a doctor of pharmacy and has been teaching microbiology at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Grenoble for more than 20 years. He is a Teacher-Researcher at the Institute of Structural Biology. He obtained his doctorate in clinical virology at the Claude-Bernard University (Lyon) and practiced medical biology at the Pasteur Institute in Lyon. His group has been involved in clinical investigation for about ten years, particularly in the field of viral diseases. He is interested in host-pathogen relations, particularly in developing new diagnostic methods, and is the author of more than 80 publications and book chapters in this field. It is concerned about the influences (positive or negative) that the environment (in the broad sense) can have on human health.

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  • FABRE Denis

    Denis Fabre is an engineer from the Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Doctor of Engineering (Applied Geology) and then holds an Habilitation to Direct Research from the University of Grenoble. He made his career in Grenoble at the Dolomieu Institute and then at the IUT de Génie civil, and participated in the creation of the first engineering school in France (Polytech-Grenoble), before joining the Chair of Geotechnics from Cnam, in Paris. His research at the Lirigm de Grenoble and then at the Cnam focuses on the mechanical properties of rocks, the geotechnical characterization of rock masses, the stability of underground structures and natural risks (slope stability, evolution of permafrost in the context of climate change) He has written about ten books and is the author of more than 130 publications. He is particularly active in learned geotechnical societies (French Committees of Engineering Geology and Rock Mechanics) and is a member of the editorial boards of several journals (Revue Française de Géotechnique, Tunnels et Espace Souterrain, Géologues...). He was a member of the INERIS scientific commission. He is a member of the Scientific Council of the Chartreuse Regional Natural Park, which he chaired for ten years. He is a member of the scientific council of the Auvergne-Rhône Alpes "Sustainable Infrastructures" cluster (INDURA). He has been President of the Association for the Development of Landslide Research since 2010.

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  • FLAVIGNY Etienne

    Etienne Flavigny is an engineer from the Ecole Centrale des Arts et Manufactures (1968) and holds a doctorate from the University of Grenoble. His teaching activities at the University of Grenoble have focused on the disciplines of Mechanics, Civil Engineering and Soil Mechanics / Geotechnics. He participated and directed the IUP de Génie Civil in its creation. Another aspect concerns continuing training activities by developing sessions on calculation by the "finite element method" in geotechnics, on laboratory or in-situ tests in collaboration with the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussées' continuing training. Other sessions also focused on Geotechnics in Earthquake Engineering.

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  • FLOR Jan-Bert

    Jan-Bert Flor completed his higher education in the Netherlands at the University of Utrecht. After post-doctoral studies at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP) at the University of Cambridge (UK), he was recruited as a Research Fellow at the CNRS and assigned to the Laboratoire des Ecoulements Géophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), in Grenoble in 1996, and then promoted to Director of Research in 2010.

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  • FONTAN Jacques

    Jacques Fontan was a Professor at the Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse. He created the Laboratoire d'Aérologie(associated with the CNRS) of which he was the director from 1982 to 1986. His research has focused on the dynamics and physico-chemistry of the lower atmosphere, with a particular focus on pollution problems. They have resulted in more than a hundred publications. He was one of the pioneers of research in this field in France and in the intertropical regions.

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  • FRANZETTI Bruno

    Bruno Franzetti is a research director at the CNRS. He heads an interdisciplinary research group at the IBS (Institute of Structural Biology) Mixed Research Unit (UMR 5075) created by CEA, CNRS and Grenoble Alpes University, as well as a national research group (GDR) on Archaeology. His work aims to develop Archean biological systems to dissect complex cellular functions, develop new methods in structural biology and research new biocatalysts and drugs derived from the biodiversity of extremophilic microorganisms. He has been responsible for several research programs aimed at understanding the adaptation of microorganisms to extreme environments. In this context, he discovered and characterized several cellular machineries responsible for the targeted destruction of cellular components.

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  • FRENOT Yves

    Yves Frenot began his scientific activity on the terrestrial ecology of the French sub-Antarctic islands (Crozet, Kerguelen, Amsterdam). His interest has focused on the role of man and climate change in the exceptional biodiversity of these southern islands, which are particularly sensitive to disturbances. He has carried out more than 15 missions in the past 20 years. He joined IPEVin 2003, where he served for 7 years as Deputy Director in charge of scientific programmes. In January 2010, he took over the head of the institute, which is responsible in particular for several research infrastructures: the Franco-German AWIPEV station in Spitsbergen, the Dumont d'Urville station in Terre Adélie, the Franco-Italian Concordia station on the Antarctic high plateau. The IPEV is also responsible for the support and implementation of scientific programmes in the French sub-Antarctic islands. Yves Frenot has participated in the French delegation to the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings since 2003 and chaired the Committee for the Protection of the Environment of the Treaty (CPE) between 2010 and 2014. He was also Vice President of COMNAP (Council of Mangers of National Antarctic Programmes) and Member of the Executive Board of the European Polar Board until 2017.

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  • FURLA Paola

    Paola FURLA is Professor of Animal Biology at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis (member of the Côté d'Azur University). After studying at the University of Milan (Italy), she obtained a PhD in Science at the University of Aix Marseille II on the mechanisms of inorganic carbon absorption within a Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate symbiosis. She took up her first teaching and research positions at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis in 2001. Since 2008, she has been leading and leading a research team belonging to UMR 7138 Evolution Paris Seine interested in the adaptation and acclimatisation processes of Cnidarians to life in symbiosis. Through multiple approaches ranging from biochemistry and physiology to evolutionary biology, she deciphers the mechanisms responsible for both maintaining and breaking the symbiotic association. She is co-author of about forty publications in international peer-reviewed journals and has supervised eight PhD theses. At her University, she also co-directs a master's degree in marine biology and is involved in many other collective teaching responsibilities. Since 2010, she has been a member of the National Council of Universities in Section 68.

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  • GARREC Jean-Pierre

    Jean-Pierre Garrec was Director of Research at INRA until 2008. He was first interested in atmospheric pollution by fluorine and its interactions with vegetation, research carried out within the CEA-Grenoble's Vegetal Biology laboratory. Then, as Research Fellow at the CNRS, he headed the Research Team "Microanalysis X in Plant Biology - Study of ion movements linked to stomatal movements". As part of this team, his physiological research aimed to attempt to define the exact relationships between ionic accumulation and different stomatal movements, as well as causal relationships. In 1985, he joined the INRA Research Centre in Nancy to head the Air Pollution Laboratory of the Forest Ecology and Ecophysiology Unit (Forest and Natural Environment Department). Within INRA, his fundamental physiological research concerns the study of the "tree-atmosphere" interface (which includes the cuticle, cuticular waxes, stomata at leaf level and bark at trunk level), and more precisely the study of the mechanisms of perturbations of this interface induced by different environmental stresses: ozone, dry and wet acid deposition, various atmospheric pollutants, CO2, ultraviolet etc.... At the same time, as part of his applied research, he has developed original plant methods for monitoring the environment in order to assess the risks associated with exposure to air pollution.

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  • GERMON Jean-Claude

    Jean Claude Germon is Honorary Research Director of the INRA. Agronomist engineer (Montpellier), graduate in Pedology (University of Montpellier) and in General Microbiology and Microbiology of Soils (Institut Pasteur), he has developed studies on the purifying functioning of soils, on the nitrogen cycle in cultivated soils and the bioavailability of nitrogen from organic waste, on gas losses by denitrification and nitrogen protoxide (N2O) emissions by cultivated soils. The work of his team made it possible to develop a method for evaluating these losses on the scale of cultivated plots and led to extrapolations over time and at different territorial scales, highlighting the decisive role of agricultural practices on these losses and gaseous emissions.He was Director of the INRA Soil Microbiology Laboratory (1987-1997), was a member of the Scientific Council of the SDU department of the CNRS and the Scientific Council of the "Surfaces and Continental Interfaces" division of the INSU, project manager at the MSTP of the Ministry of Research and then at the Research Evaluation Agency (AERES). An expert in IPCC working groups involved in the assessment of N2O and CH4 emissions from soils, he is one of the scientists associated by the IPCC with the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of the Académie d'Agriculture de France.

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  • GILLET-CHAULET Bruno

    1994: Diploma of Engineering from the National School of Meteorology. 1995: Assigned to the Research and Development Department of the North-East Inter-Regional Centre in Illkirch-Graffenstaden. 1997: Assigned to the General Forecasting Department in Toulouse. He is now Chief Forecaster at Météo France.

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  • GIREL Jacky

    Since 2012, Jacky Girel has been a scientific collaborator at the Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA, Université Grenoble-Alpes); he is an expert in the management and restoration of vegetation in anthropized hydrosystems and participates in the training of ecological engineers (M2 "Biology-Ecology-Evolution ; Environmental Management course" at the Université Grenoble-Alpes). As a research engineer in Plant Ecology at the CNRS, he has participated in national and international interdisciplinary research programs. Its activity aimed to highlight the mechanisms at the origin of plant biodiversity in mountain river hydrosystems.

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  • GOBERT Julie

    Julie Gobert holds a doctorate in land use planning/urban planning and geography. It is linked to the LESU Laboratory. Based on sociology and political science methods (Sciences-Po Lille, 2000-2004), his research focuses on the issues of anchoring and territorial integration of infrastructures (energy production, transport, biomass transformation, etc.) in relation to the issues of social acceptability and environmental inequality. It has particularly focused on the theme of socio-environmental compensation. It currently carries out studies (regional, ADEME, European or industrial projects) aimed at helping local authorities or industrialists to better link the objectives of economic development and the creation (or maintenance) of local value with environmental requirements. Circular economy, industrial ecology and energy transition have therefore entered the spectrum of his work.

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  • GOOSSE Hugues

    Hugues Goosse is research director at the Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (F.R.S - FNRS) and professor at the Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium) where he teaches climatology and related disciplines. His research focuses on the development of climate models, the comparison between model results and different types of observations, and the application of these models to study past and future climate change. It focuses on both natural variations and human-induced climate change. More specifically, this recent work focuses on the interactions between sea ice and the ocean in the Southern Ocean, climate change over the past millennia and data assimilation methods in paleoclimatology. He has published a book on climate dynamics and modelling at Cambridge University Press (http://www.climate.be/climatebook/)

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  • GRILLOT Renée

    Since the 1980s, his research has focused on "opportunistic deep fungal infections" (pathophysiology, immunology, biological diagnosis), linked to deep immunosuppression and due to environmental micromyces or endogenous yeasts. This work was carried out until 2002 in the framework of recognized laboratories: the UPRES-A CNRS "Relations Hôte-Agents Pathogènes" then the EA-UJF "Interactions Cellulaires Parasites-Hôte". The experience acquired in 30 years is reflected in the management of a European contract (Molecularepidemiology of invasive aspergillosis: 1997-2000), some 100 publications and book chapters and the writing of a book "Human fungal infections: diagnostic approach", Elsevier-France, 1995, 400p). Her career path has been selected from the twelve "Women of Science" portraits of the Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble (2000). At the end of her career, she mainly devoted herself to expertise activities at the Institut de Veille Sanitaire (evaluation of National Reference Centres) and academic activities, including the Direction of the Faculty of Pharmacy of Grenoble (2007-2011). Renée GRILLOT has been a full member of the National Academy of Pharmacy since 2001.

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  • GUÉRIAU Pierre

    Pierre Guériau is a paleontologist, post-doctoral fellow at the IPANEMA laboratory and at the SOLEIL synchrotron. He is mainly interested in the conquest of continents by animals and the establishment of the first terrestrial ecosystems during the Devonian. In this context, he discovered in an exceptionally preserved deposit in Belgium the oldest continental representatives of several groups of crustaceans, including fossils extraordinarily similar to current triops and artemias. His research is now focused on the physico-chemical characterization of these fossils, using advanced imaging techniques, in order to understand the mechanisms underlying their exceptional fossilization.

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  • GUIDOTTI Sylvie

    Sylvie Guidotti is in charge of the Environment and Health Division, Studies & Consulting Department (Meteorological Services Department) at Météo-France. This division aims on the one hand to maintain and develop all operational tools to meet the needs of environmental emergencies monitoring (air pollution) within the framework of the establishment's regulatory obligations and its international responsibilities, and on the other hand, ensures, for its operational component, the monitoring and evolutions of the MOCAGE model used for air quality forecasting, as well as the monitoring of requests related to biometerological subjects. Since 2015, Sylvie Guidotti has been managing the regional component of the production component as part of the Copernicus Atmosphere services (CAMS project), services delegated by the European Union to ECMWF (medium-term weather forecasting centre).

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  • HANTZ Didier

    Didier Hantz is a Civil Engineer of Mines, Doctor of Engineering from the University of Grenoble 1 and holds an Habilitation to Lead Research. He completed his thesis on the dynamics and hydrology of alpine glaciers at the LGGE (Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement), before joining CERCHAR (Centre d'Etudes et Recherches de Charbonnages de France), where he worked mainly on the stability of the slopes of mines and open-air quarries. Since 1989, he has been a lecturer at the University of Grenoble Alpes (UGA), where he teaches as part of the University's engineering school (Polytech Grenoble). He conducts his research at the laboratory ISTerre (Institute of Earth Sciences), in the Geophysics of Risks and the Environment team, where he studies the erosion processes of cliffs, which lead to rock falls, and develops new methods for assessing the hazard (and risk) posed by these landslides.

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  • JOYARD Jacques

    Jacques Joyard is Honorary Research Director at the CNRS. He carried out almost all of his research at the CNRS, in the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale (Joint CNRS, CEA, INRA and Université Grenoble Alpes unit) which he headed from 1991 to 2002. His research has focused mainly on the limiting envelope of chloroplasts, including the determination of its structural and functional characteristics, which testify to the endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts. Coupling biochemical and molecular approaches with functional approaches, this work has demonstrated the unique role of envelope membranes in the biogenesis and physiology of chloroplast and plant cell. This research on the envelope of chloroplasts has been the subject of more than a hundred scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals. Scientific advisor at the CEA, he participated in the creation of Rhône-Alpes Genopole (of which he was Deputy Director, then Director), Labex GRAL, etc.

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  • JOYE Jean-François

    Professor of public law at Chambéry and current director of the CDPPOC (EA4143) and Co-director of the Master in Mountain Law, he has considerable experience in collaborative research projects both as part of the delegation to the CNRS that he held within GRIDAUH, (GIP 2010-2014: ex. Evaluation of the first SCOT - 2009, Writing of the PLU - 2012, Urbanization of the mountain - 2013), either in its Faculty (various Interreg projects). His research focuses mainly on urban planning law and public finance. They are part of a critical approach to the legal standards of society's commitment to sustainable development: JF Joye, Construire et aménager en montagne après la loi du 28 décembre 2016: les communes face à leurs responsabilités, la Revue Juridique de l'Environnement, mai 2017, JF Joye, Les outils juridiques de l'aménagement touristique de la montagne, Les loisirs de montagne sous Vichy : droit et politique, PUG, 2017, JF Joye, Le chalet d'alpage, nouvel enjeu d'urbanisation dans les pâturages, Constr.-urb. mars 2015, pp. 8-14, JF Joye, G. Calley, JF Dreuille (dir.), L'accident en montagne, 2015, LGDJ, 453 p.

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  • KHOCHBIN Saadi

    Saadi Khochbin, Director of Exceptional Class Research at the CNRS, heads a research team (Epigenetics and Cell Signalling Laboratory) and the Signalling and Chromatin Department at the Institut Albert Bonniot (Centre de recherche Université Grenoble Alpes, Inserm U1209, CNRS UMR 5309). His work, including the discovery and functional characterization of new actors in cell signalling through acetylation and factors controlling the final programming of male germ line cells, has highlighted fundamental cellular regulatory networks and led to the emergence of new concepts linking very fundamental concepts to translational research with medical and industrial applications in the field of cancer.

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  • KLEIN François

    During his PhD and postdoctoral research at UCLouvain, François Klein studied the mechanisms responsible for past climate change, adopting the approach "the past is the key to the present and the future". One of these main research projects concerned the analysis of the variability of East African rainfall over the past millennium. To do this, he used various of the most sophisticated climate models available, which he combined with other sources of information on past climates, such as reconstructions from various natural archives, through a data assimilation method. Recently, François Klein has decided to focus more on the technical aspects of climate models than on scientific research, and is now working on their development, optimization, and installation on supercomputers, still since UCLouvain.

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  • KRINNER Gerhard

    Gerhard Krinner is research director at the CNRS Glaciology and Geophysics Laboratory of the Environment Laboratoire de Glaciologie et de Géophysique de l'Environnement . For more than 20 years, Gerhard Krinner has been working on the climate of the polar regions. He is particularly interested in surface processes at high northern latitudes (involving snow and ground freezing) and the mass balance of ice caps. These two aspects of polar climate are of global importance: the mass balance of continental ice caps (particularly Greenland and Antarctica) strongly determines the evolution of global sea level, while the possible future thawing of large portions of frozen ground in high latitudes (in Siberia and North America) may amplify future climate change through increased CO2 and methane emissions. Gerhard Krinner uses digital climate models to study past, present and future polar climate. He participated in the work of the IPCC 5th report as lead author for the chapter "Long-term climate change" and is currently chair of the Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) project, one of the four main pillars of the World Climate Research Programme led mainly by the World Meteorological Organization.

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  • LA BRANCHE Stéphane

    Associate Research Professor, "Planet, Energy, Climate" Chair, PACT Laboratory, Grenoble Institute of Political Studies (IEPG), member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

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  • LACHASSAGNE Patrick

    Geologist and doctor of quantitative hydrogeology, Patrick Lachassagne has focused his expertise and research activity on complex aquifers: groundwater in crystalline, volcanic, karst and glacial basement regions, natural, thermal and geothermal mineral water aquifers. It has led to a major evolution in scientific concepts concerning the structure and hydrogeological functioning of fractured basement aquifers (plutonic and metamorphic rocks): it has demonstrated that their permeability is due to supergenic alteration processes and has resulted in many operational applications in hydrogeology. For more than 20 years at BRGM, he has participated in the development of specific methodologies for the recognition, management, modelling and protection of these complex aquifers, during operational and research projects in metropolitan France, in DROM-COM and abroad. For nearly 9 years, he has been pursuing this activity, combining research and operational work for Danone Eaux on the natural mineral water deposits of Evian, Volvic, Badoit and La Salvetat and, more occasionally, internationally. Patrick Lachassagne provides regular university teaching and professional training. Since 2014, he has created and managed the "Water Institute by Evian" (www.waterinstitutebyevian.org). He is a certified hydrogeologist and vice-president of the French Committee of Hydrogeology of the International Association of Hydrogeologists.

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  • LALLEMENT Christian

    Christian Lallement, hydraulic engineer, worked at the Rhone Mediterranean Corsica Water Agency, then in several departments of EDF (Electricité de France), Direction de la Production et de l'Ingénierie Hydraulique. Its activity has led it to operate flow measurement networks (in the Massif Central, Corsica, the Rhone and Rhine basins), to contribute to the improvement of measurement systems (flow and its remote transmission), to the development of data criticism tools, to assist decision-making in the drawing of tare curves, to enhance the value of old hydrometric data, to take into account historical information (XV-XIX century) for determining past floods. From 1990 to 2000, Christian Lallement was president of the French commission for the standardization of flow measurement in open channels. He has been retired since July 1, 2017, after having held the position of Water and Environment Director at the Alpes Hydraulic Production Unit.

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  • LANGLOIS Cyril

    Coming from the École Normale Supérieure de Paris where I followed the training in Earth sciences as well as courses in evolutionary biology, aggregated in Life and Earth Sciences, I sought to maintain a wide range of interests, with a thesis combining numerical modelling, paleontology and animal physiology, then diversified courses, ranging from geophysics to animal and human evolution, and finally adding in 2016 a Master of Science History, while cultivating a certain interest for archaeology. I am an associate professor of Life and Earth Sciences at the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon.

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  • LAVERGNE Sébastien

    Sébastien Lavergne is a CNRS research fellow at Laboratoire d'Écologie Alpine (LECA) since 2008. His research activity focuses on understanding the genetic basis of species adaptation and studying diversification mechanisms.

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  • LE TALLEC Thomas

    Thomas Le Tallec has prepared his doctoral thesis in ecophysiology, entitled "Impacts of light pollution on the behaviours, biological rhythms and physiological functions of a non-human primate, Microcebusmurinus" within the Mixed Research Unit 7179 "Adaptive Mechanisms and Evolution" (CNRS/MNHN) from 2011 to 2014 under the co-direction of Marc Théry and Martine Perret. His work shows that exposure to light pollution in urban/peri-urban environments could modify the locomotor and feeding behaviours of nocturnal mammals, alter their perception of the photoperiod and, consequently, disrupt their reproduction and seasonal thermoregulation. He is an Associate Professor.

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  • LEGUBE Bernard

    Bernard LEGUBE is Professor Emeritus at the University of Poitiers, attached for research to the unit of chemistry of media and materials of Poitiers (UMR CNRS 7285). A trained physico-chemist, specialist in water quality and treatment, he is the author of recent books in this field. Its own scientific production is about 300 miscellaneous publications (nearly 140 publications of rank A, more than 4000 citations, h-index 38, in 2017). Bernard Legube was Director of the Water Chemistry and Microbiology Unit (UMR CNRS 6008), Director of the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d'ingénieurs de Poitiers, where he also taught, and then President of the PRES (now COMUE) Limousin-Poitou-Charentes. He is currently president of the consortium of French institutions in support of the Vietnam France University (USTH), vice-president of IANESCO Chimie (analysis and testing laboratory) and has chaired the scientific council of the Adour-Garonne Water Agency since 2015. Bernard Legube is also an expert consultant for local authorities, design offices and distribution companies in the field of drinking water production (quality of resources, production chains, distribution, impact of climate change).

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  • LEROY Michel

    Engineer in Meteorology, then in Bridges, Waters and Forests, I worked from 1980 to 2011 in the Observation Systems Department of Météo-France, first as a development engineer (ground observation sensors, acquisition stations, radiosonde), then as head of a Quality Division; Methods and References (observation methods, instrument testing, metrology laboratory), then as head of the surface observation department (ground networks, specifications and maintenance, automatic observation on aerodromes). I have had many activities within WMO (CIMO, Commission on Instruments and Methods of Observation) and ICAO (expert groups on automatic observation). Retired since April 1, 2017, with some consulting activities in instrumentation and observation methods (Metobs Consulting).

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  • LETT Christophe

    Christophe Lett is Research Director at Development Research Institute. He is a member of the International Joint UMMISCO Unit (Mathematical Modelling and Complex Systems Informatics Unit) and associated with the Joint Research Unit MARBEC (MARine Biodiversity, Exploitation and Conservation). He is working on modelling ecosystem dynamics using mathematical (dynamic systems) and computer (individual-centred models) approaches. He is a specialist in modelling the dispersion of marine organisms and has contributed to the development of the Ichthyop open source software (http://www.ichthyop.org) which allows it to be studied by simulation.

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  • LILENSTEN Jean

    Jean Lilensten is research director at the CNRS, assigned to the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG). Among other work, he found a solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for high planetary atmospheres, explained part of the Martian atmospheric escape, discovered the blue auroras, and discovered the polarization of the polar aurora.

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  • LUTOFF Céline

    Céline Lutoff is a professor and researcher in social sciences at the University of Grenoble Alpes, Institute of Alpine Geography since 2001. It is linked to the PACT laboratory. It works on social vulnerability and adaptation to extreme natural phenomena (earthquakes and flash floods in particular). As such, it works in close collaboration with researchers in geosciences laboratories (LTHE and ISTerre for example). Between 2006 and 2015, she built and managed a team of researchers in the PACTE laboratory working on the environment and risks (team is associated with the Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers de Grenoble). It works to develop interdisciplinarity between geosciences and the human and social sciences, both in terms of research and training. She is involved in an international master's degree called HydroHasards and in 2011 she directed the first international and interdisciplinary summer school "Water and Society .

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  • MACHON Nathalie

    Now a professor at the Museum of Plant Ecology, Nathalie Machon did her thesis on the genetic diversity of forest trees at the ESE Laboratory of the University of Paris-Sud Orsay between 1992 and 1995. After a postdoctoral fellowship in the same institution on the effect of the increase in atmospheric CO2 on Arabidopsis thaliana populations, she joined the National Botanical Conservatory of the Paris Basin in 1996 as a lecturer. She joined CESCO when it was created in 2002 and is a member of the Urban Biodiversity Team (URBA). She is interested in the dynamics and genetics of small populations and is conducting two complementary research projects: one on populations of rare and endangered plant species and the other on urban plant populations. Since 2017, she has been the director of the Doctoral School of Natural and Human Sciences MNHN-Sorbonne University.

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  • MALARDEL Sylvie

    Sylvie Malardel worked until 2009 as a researcher in numerical prediction at the Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques (CNRM) and as a teacher at the École Nationale de la Météorologie in Toulouse. After about ten years of teaching, she published a book on the scientific basis of meteorology "Fundamentals of Meteorology" (Cépaduès éditions). Since 2009, she has been pursuing her career as a researcher in the field of numerical prediction at European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMMT), or European Centre for Medium-range WeatherForecast (ECMWF) in Reading, England.

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  • MANNEVILLE Olivier

    Olivier Manneville, Honorary Senior Lecturer in Biology-Ecology, at Laboratory of Alpine Ecology (LECA) until 2007, then at the Joseph Fourier Alpine Station (SAJF), main author of the book Le monde des tourbières et des marais, 2006, 320 pages, founding member of the Groupe d'Etudes des Tourbières (president from 1993 to 1999) ; member of various scientific councils : national peat bog relay centre (president from 2001 to 2009), Lavours Marsh National Nature Reserve (1991 to 2016), joint scientific council of the National Nature Reserves of the Etang du Grand-Lemps and Lac Luitel (president for the Luitel since 2008), etc. Supervised 30 master's courses in marine biology at the Roscoff Oceanographic Station.

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  • MARECHAL Eric

    Eric Marechal is Director of Research at the CNRS, at Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale (LPCV) where he leads with Juliette Jouhet the team "Biogenesis, dynamics and homeostasis of membrane lipids". A graduate in Natural Sciences, he completed his thesis work from 1991 to 1994 at the Joseph Fourier University under the supervision of Jacques Joyard. He then did a post-doctoral internship at Rockefeller University in New York, United States, in the laboratory of Professor Nam-Hai Chua, before being recruited at the CNRS in 1998. His research focuses on the metabolism of membrane lipids in plant cells, a very original metabolism due to the presence of a unique organelle, the plastid, and lipids absent in animal cells, galactolipids. In addition to developing his work in higher plants such as Arabidopsisthaliana, he is interested in single-celled organisms containing relatively little studied plasts despite their ecological and economic importance, such as non-chlorophyllous plasters of Apicomplex parasites (Plasmodium, malaria agent, Toxoplasma, toxoplasmosis agent) or the highly sophisticated chloroplasts of Diatoms (Phaeodylumactact) that inhabit the oceans. His work aims both to advance fundamental knowledge and to explore the possibilities of exploiting microalgae for biotechnological applications. It has therefore set up partnerships with various biotechnology players in France, Gene-IT, Cerep, Total Energies Nouvelles and Fermentalg.

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  • MARTIN-AMOUROUX Jean-Marie

    Doctorate in economics from Grenoble in 1960. Attaché, in charge and research director at the CNRS. Director of the Institut Économique et Juridique de l'Energie (1968-1982), then of the Institut d'Économie et de Politique de l'Énergie de Grenoble (1988 to 1990). Vice-president of the Pierre Mendes-France University 1970-1980. Vice-Chairman and General Rapporteur of the Long-Term Energy Group of the General Planning Commission (1982-83). Technical adviser in the office of the Minister of Research and Technology (1984-86). President of the European University and Scientific Centre of Grenoble (1991-95). Today active in the association of the Energy Encyclopedia.

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  • MARTINS Jean

    Jean Martins is Research Director at the CNRS (INSU). He led the TRANSPORE team of the Laboratory for the Study of Transfers in Hydrology and Environment (LTHE) as well as the HyDRIMZ team of the Institut des Géosciences de l'Environnement (IGE) de Grenoble UMR 5001 (CNRS, G-INP, IRD, UGA). He is editor of the journal Frontiers in Environmental Science, member of various reading committees and scientific committees (Ecodyn ECCO, Microbial EC2CO, Ecodyn EC2CO, Bioindicators of ADEME) and member of the Commission de Spécialistes Surfaces et Interfaces Continentales (CS SIC) of the INSU of the CNRS. It also carries out expert work with various local (water commissions, regions, workshop areas), national (water agency, CNRS, INRA, ADEME) and international (CEFIPRA, CAPES-COFECUBŠ, H2020) bodies. His research area at the IGE focuses on the multidisciplinary study of the fate and impacts of natural or anthropogenic contaminants within the critical environmental zone composed of the air, water and soil compartments. He is particularly interested in the reactive transfer mechanisms of dissolved and particulate contaminants (colloids, (nano)particles, pathogenic or non-pathogenic bacteria, etc.) in soils, air and water. His work aims to better understand the functioning of this critical area and thus contribute to the development of solutions for the rehabilitation or remediation of polluted environments and to limit the human and ecological impacts of pollutants.

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  • MAURIN Max

    Professor of Bacteriology, Head of the Bacteriology-Hospital Hygiene Department, CHU Grenoble Alpes (since September 2002). Head of the National Reference Centre Francisella tularensis (since 2006). Doctorate in Medicine, DES in Medical Biology, Faculty of Timone, University of Aix-Marseille II (1991). DESC "Biology of infectious agents", University of Aix- Marseille II (1993). Diploma of Advanced Studies, Bichât Faculty, University of Paris VII (1991). Doctorate from Paris VII University, Bichât Faculty, Paris VII University (1994). Habilitation to Lead Research, University of Aix- Marseille II (1997). Former intern at the Marseille Hospitals (1986-1991). Former University Hospital Assistant at the Marseille Hospitals (1991-1996). MCU-PH, Department of Prof. Didier RAOULT, Faculty of Medicine, University of Aix-Marseille II (1996-2002). Author and co-author of 135 original publications in peer-reviewed journals and 48 book chapters. Co-inventor of 5 patents. Co-editor of the journal "Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology". Member of learned societies: Société Française de Microbiologie (SFM), European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Tularemia International Society (TULISOC).

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  • MAZEL Florent

    Florent Mazel has been a postdoctoral fellow at Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada) since September 2016. He completed his thesis at Laboratory of Alpine Ecology (LECA, 2012-2015). His work aims to combine macro-ecological and macro-evolution approaches to understand the global distribution of biodiversity.

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  • MOISSELIN Jean-Marc

    Jean-Marc Moisselin is Chief Engineer of Bridges, Waters and Forests, assigned to the Operations Directorate (Direction des Opérations pour la Prévision) of Météo-France. Deputy head of the Immediate Forecast Department of Météo-France, he is in charge of convection products based on satellites or radars. His previous functions were the control of numerical prediction models and then R&D in climatology.

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  • MOLINER-DUBOST Marianne

    Marianne Moliner-Dubost is a lecturer at the Université Jean Moulin - Lyon 3, since September 2003. She defended her doctoral thesis on Law in the face of air pollution and climate change in December 2001 (thesis prize from the University of Lyon 3 and special prize from the French Society for Environmental Law) and her habilitation to conduct research in January 2011. Marianne Moliner-Dubost specializes in air pollution and climate law. She is the author of a book on environmental law (Dalloz Publishing, 2015) and numerous articles (51) and notes (68) on environmental law.

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  • MONDEJAR FERNANDEZ Jorge

    Jorge Mondéjar Fernández is a paleontologist, research assistant at the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle and professor of Life and Earth Sciences in Paris. He is interested in the origin of the first tetrapods and the evolution of other Devonian aquatic vertebrate groups. He has worked on fossils from all over the world (Latin America, Russia, Morocco, etc.) that illustrate the great diversity of Devonian vertebrates before they leave the water. His current research focuses on describing several new species using new virtual imaging and phylogenetic reconstruction technologies to better understand their anatomy and kinship relationships.

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  • MOREAU René

    René Moreau is Professor Emeritus at Grenoble-INP, where he has spent his entire career, where he directed the ENSHMG from 1982 to 1987 and where he taught fluid mechanics at all levels. His research has focused on the MHD of liquid metals, including turbulence that tends to become two-dimensional in the presence of a fairly intense magnetic field, as well as various applications to metallurgical processes. He was the founder of the MADYLAM Scientific Interest Group, for "MAgnétoDYnamique des Liquides, Applications à la Métallurgie", which became the EPM group (for Elaboration par Procédés Magnétiques) from Laboratoire Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Procédés (SIMaP). He has been a member of the Academy of Sciences since 1993 and a member of the Academy of Technology since 2000. He is the author of numerous publications, a monograph "Magnetohydrodynamics" (Springer, 1990) and a popular science book "L'air et l'eau" (EDP sciences, 2013).

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  • MORVAN Dominique

    Dominique MORVAN is currently a professor at University of Aix-Marseille and heads the Mechanics Department of the Faculty of Sciences. From 1985 to 2000, he was a research fellow at the CNRS, successively in the Biological and Medical Engineering Department of the University of Compiègne, at the Fluid Mechanics Institute of Marseille and at the Research Institute on Unbalanced Phenomena (Marseille). During his career, he has been interested in problems of modeling blood flow in cardiac cavities, diffusion transport in a bioartificial pancreas model, solid/liquid phase changes in crystalline growing metals and for power laser applications in the mechanical industry. Since 1998, he has been developing research work on the physical modelling of wildfires within the Mechanics, Modelling and Clean Processes Laboratory (M2P2).

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  • MOTTEZ Fabrice

    Passionate about astronomy since childhood, Fabrice Mottez is a researcher at the CNRS and works at the Laboratoire Univers et Théories (LUTH) of the Observatoire de Paris-Meudon. He studies the effects of the magnetic fields of stars and planets on their environment. His work focuses on the acceleration processes of matter in the northern lights of the Earth and Jupiter. Its approach is based on numerical simulation, analytical calculations, all conducted in interaction with observers. Since 2006, he has also been working on the environments of neutron stars, pulsars. Neutron stars are small, extremely dense and magnetized stars. A fan of popular science, he wrote as the rumour of the Mayan apocalypse spread, with the journalist Dider Jamet, a book entitled "2012 Scenarios for the End of the World", published by Belin. A book on the polar aurora is being prepared (Belin Publishing). He is also co-author of an academic book, "Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics" published by Wiley.

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  • NEMERY Julien

    Julien Némery is a Senior Lecturer at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure Energie, Eau, Environnement of the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble. His research focuses on the biogeochemical cycles of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus) and the dynamics of suspended sediments in aquatic environments impacted by human activities. Julien Némery studied biogeochemistry and environmental sciences at Pierre and Marie Curie University (Paris 6). In 2003 he defended his doctoral thesis on phosphorus mobility and eutrophication risk assessment in the Seine catchment area. Since 2004, he has been conducting research at the Institute of Environmental Geosciences (IGE) on different aquatic ecosystems (rivers, reservoirs, estuaries) and in different regions of the world (French Alps, Seine Basin, Mexican Highlands, Red River Delta and Saigon River in Vietnam).

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  • NICOT François

    François Nicot is currently Research Director in the ETNA Unit of the Institut national de Recherche en Sciences et Technologies pour l'Environnement et l'Agriculture (IRSTEA), where he is in charge of the Geomechanics group. his work focuses on the mechanical behaviour of granular materials, with a particular interest in multi-scale approaches. The fields of application mainly concern the modelling of the behaviour of geomaterials, as well as the analysis of the stability of slopes and protective structures against risks of gravity origin, in the continuity of the MeGe Research Group (GDR) (Multi-physical and multi-scale approaches in geo-environmental mechanics), to whose animation he contributed between 2008 and 2015, he participates in the coordination of the GDR International Geo-Mech.Author of more than 100 articles published in international journals, as well as numerous collective works, he is also editor-in-chief of the international journal EJECE (European Journal of Environmental and Civil Engineering).

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  • PEPIN Marie-Hélène

    My first position, after graduating as a meteorological engineer in 1982, was as a research fellow in the Climate Science Department. In 1985, I followed my husband to Brazil where I prepared a doctorate at the Instituto de Pesquisas Espaciais de Saõ José dos Campos. Back in France after ten years abroad, I returned to Météo-France as a portfolio manager for strategic projects related to observation or management information technology at the Météo-France Department. In 2001, I joined the Observation Systems Department, where, as Quality Manager, I led the process that enabled this Department to obtain ISO-9001 certification in 2005. I then returned to the General Management in 2007 as head of internal communication for the establishment. Since 2013, I have been in charge of the Documentation Department, and as such, I deal with partnerships with the BNF and the CNAM.

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  • PEREZ Emile

    Emile PEREZ is Director of Research at the CNRS in chemistry, currently co-director of the SMODD group in the IMRCP laboratory at the Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse. He holds a PhD from the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse (France) obtained in 1987. He also has a master's degree in molecular and supramolecular chemistry. His research is in the field of chemical and physico-chemical studies of molecular systems organized for biotechnological applications or material design. In the SMODD group, his interest focuses more particularly on the use of molecular systems organized for sustainable development: bioinspired systems and/or recyclable green materials, molecular economics (reactivity, bioactive formulations). He also teaches formulation in master2 at the Paul Sabatier University.

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  • PIEGAY Hervé

    Hervé Piegay is a geographer and CNRS Research Director at the EVS Laboratory (ENS de Lyon). He works mainly on the geomorphology of river systems, around the challenges of river management and restoration. He is also interested in new techniques for diagnosing and monitoring the effect of actions. It works in interaction with practitioners (Water Agencies, Regions, Ministry of Ecology, AFB, Compagnie Nationale du Rhône, EDF, local authorities). He coordinated an international team on the revitalization of the Rhine downstream of Kembs, research programs on the evaluation of river restoration projects and the state of braided rivers in the Rhône basin. Since 2010, he has been leading the scientific team of the Rhône Valley Human-Media Observatory. He has contributed to more than 230 scientific articles in specialized journals and book chapters. He has coordinated several synthesis works, such as river geomorphology tools with M.G. Kondolf of the University of Berkeley (2003, 2016). He has been co-leading since 2018 with C. Douady and S. Barraud H2O'Lyon, a University Research School focused on integrated watershed management.

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  • PIQUE Jean-Paul

    Jean-Paul Pique, a former student of the ENS de Cachan and agrégé de Physique, was Director of Research at the CNRS in the speciality "Atoms and molecules, optics and lasers". He is now a Scientific Collaborator at Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPhy), a joint University-Grenoble-Alpes and CNRS unit. During his career, he first used non-linear optical methods to study crystallographic phase transitions in solids. He then turned to the spectroscopic study of molecules. Using the first ultra-high resolution lasers, he studied interactions involving the properties of the atomic nucleus and showed for the first time a symmetry break inducing the reversal of the nuclear spin. During long stays in the United States at MIT, he studied the correspondence between classical chaos and "quantum chaos" in the very high resolution spectra of polyatomic molecules. Laser technology having made spectacular progress, particularly at LIPhy, he has developed close collaboration with researchers from observatories in Lyon, Grenoble and Hawaii in the context of laser star projects. He is currently working on a patent for a new type of laser with multiple applications such as THz imaging, lidar (optical radar), metrology and spectroscopy. He is the author of about 100 articles published in international scientific journals, two patents and has directed a dozen theses.

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  • PITHON Marion

    Engineer at the School of Meteorology, Marion Pithon joined the "Environment and Health" division of the Department of Meteorological Services of Météo Francein 2009, where she is in charge of the operational production of the regional component of the CAMS project (COPERNICUS-Atmosphère), which provides Air Quality services in the European domain, thanks to the contribution of about ten European chemistry-transport models. Correspondent of the "Health" commission of the High Council of Meteorology, she also participates in the activities of the establishment in bio-meteorology, on environmental themes, in relation with health organizations.

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  • PITON Guillaume

    Guillaume PITON studied at the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble in the former School of Hydraulics and Mechanics, now called ENS de l'Energie de l'Eau et de l'Environnement (ENSE³). He then worked as a hydraulic engineer from 2009 to 2013 at ARTELIA (formerly SOGREAH), on the Grenoble and Chambéry sites. He has carried out multiple water study and development missions: hydrology, hydraulic modelling, design of flood protection and river rehabilitation works, site preparation and execution control, impact study and regulatory file. In 2013 he joined the IRSTEA (ex-CEMAGREF) to carry out a doctoral thesis on the control of solid transport of torrents by torrential correction works and deposition ranges. This work has made it possible to combine experimental approaches with field analyses and historical research. Since his defence in 2016, he has been a post-doctoral fellow in the same research unit and continues his work on torrential hydraulics and risk protection.

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  • POMPANON François

    François Pompanon is a professor at the University of Grenoble Alpes. Since January 2016 he has been Director of the Laboratory of Alpine Ecology (LECA). His research activity aims to understand the mechanisms at the origin of biodiversité́ and its evolution through an environmental genomics approach, using recent developments in molecular biology (New Sequencing Techniques). He has been involved in the development of molecular markers to describe species diversity from environmental samples, including applications in diet characterization. He is currently developing projects to understand the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the adaptation and domestication process in small ruminants through sequencing of complete genomes.

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  • POULENARD Jérôme

    Jérôme Poulenard is Professor of Soil Sciences at the University of Savoie-Mont Blanc and is assigned to the EDYTEM laboratory (Environnement DYnamique et TErritoire de la Montagne). He studies the history and functioning of soils in mountain areas. By using lake sediments as natural archives, he aims to reveal the memory of ecosystems and to reconstruct the history of the relationship between humans and the soil. He is responsible for the research theme "Long-term trajectories of mountain socio-ecosystems" common to the LECA/CARRTEL/LCME/EDYTEM laboratory at UGA. He is also Director of Studies for the EPGM Master's Degree in "Equipment, Protection and Management of Mountain Environments" at the University of Savoie Mont Blanc

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  • PUJOL Olivier

    Olivier Pujol is a doctor in atmospheric physics, qualified to direct research and a physics associate. After studies at the Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse and a thesis at the Laboratoire d'aérologie (Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées) on precipitating systems and their observation by microwave remote sensing, defended in 2006, he became a lecturer at the University of Lille, at Laboratoire d'optique atmosphérique. There, his research activities extend to the study of water vapour, aerosol-cloud couplings and light-matter interaction in the field of atmospheric optics. He has also collaborated with the industrial world (Thalès) and is a co-inventor of patents. In 2013, he obtained the HDR. He teaches in Bachelor's degree, in preparation for the external agrégation of physics and in the international Master 2 "Atmospheric Environment" in the unit "Physics of the atmosphere". He participates in a national competition as an author of physics subjects and, for the past ten years, has also co-authored several higher education books.

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  • PUPPO Alain

    Alain Puppo is Professor Emeritus at the University of Nice - Sophia-Antipolis. Holder of a PhD in Plant Biology, he has devoted most of his career to the study of the symbiosis of nitrogen fixing Legumes - Rhizobium. After a postdoctoral fellowship in Professor Barry Halliwell's Laboratory at King's College London, he focused on examining the role of Active Oxygen Species in signal exchange between symbiotic partners. He is the author of more than 100 scientific publications and has coordinated two Marie Curie European research and training networks. He has also been involved in the training of teachers in Life and Earth Sciences and was a member of the CAPES jury. He was Deputy Director of the INRA - CNRS - University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis Joint Research Unit "Biotic Interactions and Plant Health" in Sophia-Antipolis, and a member of the National Council of Universities and the National Scientific Research Committee. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

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  • RAYNAUD Dominique

    Dominique Raynaud is a glaciologist and paleo-climatologist. His career at the CNRS has been mainly dedicated to studying the air trapped in the ice of Antarctica and Greenland and decoding his climate messages. His contributions cover areas such as the past altitude of ice caps using the air content of ice as a paleoaltimeter and a tool to constrain ice core chronologies, the isotopic composition of trapped air (18O and 15N), the study of the N2/O2 ratio, pioneering measurements of atmospheric CO in ice. His most famous contribution, with his team at the Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement (LGGE), concerns the reconstruction of the composition of CO2 and CH4 and the understanding of the link between greenhouse gases and climate on the scale of glacial-interglacial cycles and putting into perspective their increase since the beginning of the industrial era. Dominique Raynaud was Director of the LGGE from 1995 to 2002. He has been a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) since 1992 and as such co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

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  • RIBES Aurélien

    Researcher at CNRM since 2009 on the theme of human influence on climate, an area known to specialists as the "detection and attribution" of climate change. In particular, I work on statistical methods to quantify human influence on both average climate and extreme events.

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  • RISI Camille

    Camille Risi prepared her doctoral thesis, entitled "Stable water isotopes and their applications for the study of the water cycle and climate variations" at Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD, Paris) from 2006 to 2009, under the supervision of Sandrine Bony and Jean Jouzel. She then went on to study this subject during a post-doctoral stay in the United States at the University of Colorado at Boulder, under the direction of David Noone.

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  • ROQUES Alain

    Entomologist with 35 years of experience in the biology, ecology and behaviour of forest insects. From 2004 to 2017, he headed the Forest Zoology Unit of the INRA. His current activity focuses on studying the mechanisms underlying terrestrial invertebrate invasions and studying insect responses to climate change. In particular, he coordinated the inventory of exotic terrestrial invertebrates in Europe and the publication of a reference book on the relationship between climate change and processionary caterpillars.

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  • ROUX Frank

    Frank ROUX has been a Professor at the University of Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier since 2003, after having been a Chargé and then Director of Research at the CNRS since 1981. His research, conducted at Aerology Laboratory in the "Atmosphere, Ocean and Couplings" team, focus on atmospheric disturbances in tropical and mid-latitudes (storms, storms, cyclones), based on in situ and remote sensing observations (radar and satellite) as well as on numerical simulations, in order to better understand the dynamic, thermodynamic, microphysical and electrical processes that explain their structure, evolution and predictability. In recent years, he has focused his attention on the initial conditions of cyclone formation in relation to large-scale disturbances in the tropical atmosphere.

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  • RUTHERFORD A. William

    A. William (Bill) Rutherford is Professor (Chair of Solar Energy Biochemistry) in the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial College London. He had previously exercised part of his scientific career as CNRS Research Director at CEA-Saclay. Using biophysical methods, Bill Rutherford explores the structure and function of photosynthetic reaction centres. His main interest is in Photosystem II (PSII), and in particular the enzyme complex that catalyzes the oxidation of water to supply electrons to carbon binding mechanisms. Oxygen, a by-product of water oxidation, has accumulated in the atmosphere. In his efforts to mimic photosynthesis reactions, Bill Rutherford often uses the active IEHP site as a reference and model. His work on photosynthesis aims to improve efficiency for more sustainable energy production. Bill Rutherford was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2014.

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  • SABATIER Pierre

    Pierre Sabatier is a lecturer in geology at the University of Savoie Mont Blanc assigned to the EDYTEM laboratory (Environnement DYnamique et TErritoire de Montagne). He is working to reconstruct the past climate and environment from sediment cores collected mainly from lakes. In order to understand past variations, he uses sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological methods. He is responsible for the laboratory's Environmental Archives team and has published more than 30 scientific articles on climate and past environments in peer-reviewed journals. Between 2012 and 2015 he was a member of the CNRS national committee in section 19 "Earth System: Surface Envelope".

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  • SALMON Sandrine

    Sandrine Salmon is an Engineer at the National Museum of Natural History, Adaptive Mechanisms and Evolution Unit (UMR 7179 MECADEV), in the ECOTROP team. After an initial training in plant biochemistry, she entered the National Museum of Natural History to study soil invertebrates and completed a thesis on the effect of abiotic factors (acidity...) and interactions between species (predation, commensalism) on soil arthropod populations (Collembolas). She then became involved in numerous research programs on the impact of forest dynamics, forest management practices, agri-environmental and agricultural practices on biodiversity and soil functioning (organic matter mineralization). At the same time, it is creating a Collembola trait database (Coltrait) to understand the functional aspects of studying soil communities. This database has led to numerous collaborations in France and around the world as well as the contribution to the BETSI soil invertebrate database. More recently, Sandrine Salmon has been involved in research in tropical ecology, including a project on the recolonization of lava flows on Reunion Island. Currently, she is initiating research on communication between arthropods in the soil. His work has resulted in some 40 research articles published in international journals.

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  • SCHOENEICH Philippe

    Philippe Schoeneich is a geographer-geomorphologist. He did a thesis at the University of Lausanne on glacial geomorphology of the Vaud Pre-Alps (Switzerland). Since 2001, he has been professor of physical geography at the Institute of Alpine Geography (IGA) in Grenoble. His work focuses on the geomorphology of mountains, in particular on gravity movements and periglacial phenomena, as well as on natural hazards, including geohistorical approaches. He coordinates an observatory of the mountain permafrost of the French Alps, the PermaFRANCE network. He has directed or co-directed several theses on mountain permafrost and rock glaciers. He is the national correspondent of the GTN-P (Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost) for France.

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  • SELOSSE Marc-André

    Marc-André SELOSSE is a professor at the National Museum of Natural History, a visiting professor at the Universities of Gdansk (Poland) and Viçosa (Brazil) and a member of the Academy of Agriculture. His research at the Institute of Systematics, Evolution, Biodiversity (ISYEB, UMR 7205) focuses on the ecology and evolution of associations with mutual benefits (symbioses). Within ISYEB, the Plant and Fungal Interactions and Evolution Team (INEVEF), led by Marc-André Selosse, is interested in the diversity and evolutionary history of terrestrial plants (Embryophytes) and fungi (Eumycètes) in relation to their interactions with their environment. INEVEF focuses in particular on the study of mycorrhizae, a nutrient symbiosis that has appeared many times in evolution, between the roots of plants and soil fungi. Mycologist and botanist, Marc-Andre Sélosse works in particular on the mycorrhizal symbioses that unite fungi from the soil to the roots of plants. He is interested in the specific and genetic diversity of the fungi involved, and in the evolution of these symbioses (especially in orchids). He teaches in various university courses and at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and contributes to various SVT teacher training courses. President of the Société Botanique de France, he is the editor of three international scientific journals (Symbiosis, The New Phytologist and ABG - BotanyLetters). He has published nearly a hundred research articles and as many popularization articles, all freely downloadable online.

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  • SHEHZAD Wasim

    Wasim Shehzad is currently Director of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology in Lahore, Pakistan. His research covers a wide range of fields using non-invasive DNA sampling in complex biological materials from food remains or soils. The quality and quantity of such DNA is low compared to DNA extracted from tissue samples. This approach is applicable to the identification of rare and threatened species, as it does not require direct contact with these species, which are generally very difficult to study. With the advent of high throughput sequencing and meta-barcoding approaches, it is now possible to generate millions of sequences from many biological species from a single sample. Using these approaches to study the diet of endangered cats in South Asia, Wasim Shehzad supported a PhD from the University of Grenoble, under the supervision of Pierre Taberlet and François Pompanon au Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA).

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  • SIX Delphine

    Delphine SIX carries out most of her observation and research activities on glaciers in the French Alps. A specialist in mass and energy balances of glaciers, she currently coordinates a French National GLACIOCLIM Observation Service whose objective is to federate the glaciological community (and beyond, the cryosphere community) in France. Author or co-author of 40 publications in scientific journals, she also teaches Geosciences at the University of Grenoble Alpes. It is part of the IGE (Institute of Environmental Geosciences)

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  • SOMMERIA Joël

    Joël SOMMERIA, a physicist by training, is a research director at the CNRS, where he has spent his entire career. He obtained a PhD in Grenoble in 1985 on magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence and its links with two-dimensional turbulence. He then turned his attention to the processes of self-organization of turbulence. He explained the formation of large atmospheric eddies such as the Great Red Spot of Jupiter by the statistical mechanics of eddies, and reproduced this phenomenon in the laboratory. He proposed that such eddies initiate the formation of planets in the proto-planetary nebula. Since 2000, he has been in charge of the large "Coriolis" rotating platform in Grenoble, which reproduces the dynamics of atmospheric or oceanic flows. This instrument belongs to the LEGI (Laboratory of Geophysical and Industrial Flows). Joël SOMMERIA is the author of about a hundred scientific publications and co-author of a book for the public "La Physique et la Terre" (Belin and CNRS-éditions, 2000).

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  • STREB Peter

    Peter Streb is a Senior Lecturer at the Laboratory of Plant Ecophysiology at the Faculty of Sciences of Orsay (University Paris Sud XI). He is working on the effect of environmental stress on plants, in particular variable temperature and saline stress in combination with strong light. Much of his work is done in the Alps on a few alpine species. His studies aim to understand how plants acclimatize to harsh conditions and how the photosynthetic apparatus is protected under strong light.

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  • TER HALLE Alexandra

    Alexandra TER HALLE is a Research Officer at the CNRS in Chemistry. After studying at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon from 1993 to 1997, she obtained her doctorate in organic chemistry in 2000 at the Claude Bernard University in Lyon. His research then focused for seven years on the impact of irradiations on organic contaminants at the Molecular and Macromolecular Photochemistry Laboratory in Clermont-Ferrand (LPMM, UMR 6505 CNRS - Université Blaise Pascal, Aubière). She initiated and coordinated various projects (ANR Ecophyto, FUI PHYTOMAR and industrial partnership with Syngenta). At IMRCP (Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse) since September 2011, she has been studying biodegradable materials used in environmental chemistry. She is the scientific coordinator of the French program "Expedition 7th continent" dedicated to the study of plastic pollution in tropical gyresub-tropics. She is the author of approximately forty-five publications and four patents.

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  • THOMAS Muriel

    Muriel Thomas is Director of Research at INRA and conducts her research at the Institut Micalis. She is co-author of 43 publications, 3 patents and 5 book chapters. For the past 10 years, his group has been interested in the "health" effects of bacteria in digestive and respiratory physiology. We studied the effects of the microbiota on homeostasis, renewal and secretory/absorptive functions of the intestinal epithelium in gnotobiotic animals carrying groups of bacteria representative of the newborn, the healthy adult, the adult with intestinal deficiency and food bacteria. From animals carrying simplified microbiotes, we have described the specific effects of different bacterial consortia on the colon epithelium. We have also recently expanded our scope of investigation to include the effects of the pulmonary microbiota on respiratory health. Our approach, at the border between physiology and microbiology, is supported by private or academic funding and contributes to the development of knowledge and applications related to intestinal and pulmonary microbiomes.

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  • THOMAS Pierre

    Pierre Thomas is a geologist and professor at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, where he has been working since 1987, after a few years at the CNRS. Most of his research has focused on the geology of the solar system, particularly Mercury, Mars and the satellites of Jupiter. In addition to planetology, he also teaches the history of the Earth and climates, the origin of life... He is best known for his involvement in the dissemination of knowledge to the general public and in the training (initial and in-service) of high school teachers. He is the on-site scientific manager planet-terre.ens-lyon.fr, the site of the Ministry of National Education for the continuing training of SVT teachers. Its reference laboratory is the Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon : Earth, Planet, Environment.

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  • THUILLER Wilfried

    Wilfried Thuiller is CNRS Research Director at Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA) since 2005. Responsible for an ERC between 2012 and 2016, his research projects aim to better understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of biodiversity in order to understand the impact of global changes on ecosystems.

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  • TILL-BOTTRAUD Irène

    Irène Till-Bottraud is Research Director at the CNRS. She directed the Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine in Grenoble from 2011 to 2015 after having been deputy director since 2004. Her research focuses on the adaptation of species to alpine environments (Alps and Andes): study of the reproduction system, population dynamics and variation of adaptive traits along altitudinal gradients. She is currently a researcher at the Laboratory of Physical and Environmental Geography, Blaise Pascal University, Clermont Ferrand.

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  • TOURNIER Jean-Nicolas

    Jean-Nicolas Tournier is a researcher at the Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées (IRBA) in the field of infectious diseases and is particularly interested in their prevention and treatment. He is a doctor of medicine and a doctor of biology. He has worked on host-pathogen interactions in the anthrax disease model. He is a professor at the Val-de-Grâce School and a visiting scientist at the Institut Pasteur in the field of vaccinology. He is the author of about fifty publications and book chapters covering these scientific fields.

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  • VACHAUD Georges

    Georges Vachaud is Director of Research Emeritus of the CNRS and has spent his entire career in the Laboratory for the Study of Transfers in Hydrology and Environment (LTHE), which became the Institute of Environmental Geosciences (IGE) on 1 January 2017 after merging with the Laboratory of Glaciology and Geophysics of the Environment (LGGE).He has been responsible for numerous interdisciplinary research programs on transfers in unsaturated soils, aquifer contamination and the impact of urban development on surface water contamination, particularly in Asia. His work has earned him the CNRS Silver Medal (1977); the EUG Darcy Medal, 2003; the R.S. Vietnam Science Medal (2005); the Grand Prix (Dolomieu) of the Académie des Sciences (2012)

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  • VALLÉE Yannick

    Yannick Vallée began his career in Caen, as a CNRS researcher, and has been a professor of chemistry in Grenoble since 1993. He is Director of the Chemistry and Biology Department of the University of Grenoble Alpes and conducts his research within the Department of Molecular Chemistry (DCM). He has worked for a long time on organic synthesis, starting with small unstable, potentially interstellar molecules, before turning his attention to more complex molecules of biological interest. More recently, he has turned to the organic chemistry at the origin of life, questioning in particular the specific role that sulphurous amino acids (methionine, then cysteine) may have played in the primitive ocean.

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  • VANNIER Jean

    Jean Vannier is a paleontologist, research director at the CNRS and works at Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon : Terre, Planètes, Environnement. He is mainly interested in the origin of animal life. He studies fossil deposits of exceptional preservation that cover the Precambrian-Paleozoic transition and provide very precise information on the distant ancestors of modern animals and on the functioning of primitive ecosystems. His international collaborations have led him to work on Canadian (Burgess Shale), Chinese (Chengjiang), Moroccan (Fezouata) and Russian (White Sea) sites. He is currently focusing his research on the Precambrian and the stages of animal evolution that precede the Cambrian Explosion.

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  • VAUCLARE Pierre

    Pierre Vauclare is a physiobiochemist and metabolic specialist in higher plants and lake microalgae. He prepared his doctoral thesis "Structure, biogenesis and expression of the T protein of the glycine decarboxylase complex of higher plants" under the supervision of Prof. Roland Douce at the Laboratory of Cellular Plant Physiology in Grenoble. After postdoctoral fellowships in the United States (University of Louisiana) and Switzerland (Universities of Bern and Lausanne), he joined the Institut de Biologie Structurale de Grenoble in 2012 as a "Handicap" research fellow at the CNRS, within the ELMA laboratory (Extremophiles et grands assemblages moléculaires) directed by Bruno Franzetti. Since then, his work has focused mainly on the study of the physico-chemical and physiological mechanisms of micro-organisms in extreme environments.

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  • VEUILLE Michel

    Michel Veuille, after training in genetics, was a CNRS researcher in Gif-sur-Yvette, then became Director of Studies at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (EPHE, Paris). He prepared his thesis on the mechanisms of speciation and sexual selection. He studied sexual selection by repeatedly observing hundreds of genetic twins of fruit flies obtained by crossing lines made homozygous throughout their genome. This allowed him to refute or confirm hypotheses about the adaptive nature of sexual choices. A post-doctoral fellowship at Richard Lewontin's Harvard University (USA), allowed him to participate in the first research on DNA sequence polymorphism and, upon his return to France, to search for the molecular signature of natural selection in the genome. He has conducted numerous studies on this topic in African populations of Drosophila, demonstrating through coalescence theory that selection has had a positive effect on certain genes in the species' past. In addition to his scientific research, he has conducted several studies in the history of the theory of evolution, notably in collaboration with the philosopher Jean Gayon. From 1999 to 2007, Michel Veuille created and managed a CNRS unit without walls, the Evolutionary Genomics Research Group (GDR), bringing together a group of French, Belgian and Swiss teams studying the molecular genetics of populations. This GDR, later directed by Xavier Vekemans, contributed to the development in France of applications of coalescence theory. From 2003, Michel Veuille participated in the reform of the Museum by becoming the first director of the Systematic and Evolution department, which during his term of office saw the creation of an important laboratory, the UMR CNRS 7205 "systematic, evolution, biodiversity", which has since become the institut ISYEB (CNRS, EPHE, MNHN, UPMC). He was encouraged in this endeavour by the two directors of the Museum appointed after its reform, Bernard Chevassus and André Menez. He has had numerous research evaluation missions in France (notably at the Ministry of Higher Education and Research) and internationally. He was for a long time editor of the international journal Genetics. He was dean of EPHE.

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  • VILLAIN Jacques

    Jacques Villain is a theoretical physicist, retired from the CEA, member of the Academy of Sciences. He was a researcher at the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay (1961-69) and then at the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Grenoble (1970-2010), also conducting research at the ILL (Institut Laue-Langevin), at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Research Facility) and at the Institut de Physique du Solide (IFF) of the Jülich Research Centre in Germany. His research focuses mainly on condensed matter (magnetism, surfaces, crystal growth...) and statistical physics. Author of 170 scientific articles, he is also co-author of two specialized books, "Physics of Crystal Growth" (Cambridge University Press, 1998), translated from an earlier French version (Saclay-Eyrolles, 1994), and, "MolecularNanomagnets", (Oxford UniversityPress, 2006). He is also co-author of a book for the general public, "Le kaleidoscope de la Physique" (Belin, 2014).

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  • VILLARD Pascal

    Pascal Villard is a professor at the University of Grenoble Alpes. He teaches in the GCCD (Civil Engineering and Sustainable Construction) department at IUT1 in Grenoble. His research, at Laboratory 3SR, focuses on the development of numerical models dedicated to the study and dimensioning of structures in soil reinforced by piles and geosynthetics as well as the study of gravity movements (boulder falls and rock avalanches). He has participated in the writing of several synthesis works on the modelling of reinforced soil structures and is co-author with Vincent Richefeu of a work dedicated to the modelling of gravity risks. Attracted by the discrete element method (discretization of soils by a set of interacting grains), he tries to analyze the mechanisms involved in reinforced soil structures with the objective of improving dimensioning methods. Having participated in numerous projects combining intimate full-scale experiments and numerical modelling, he appreciates with interest and consideration the practitioner's opinion and critical view of these works.

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  • VINCENT Christian

    Christian VINCENT is a recognized specialist in glaciological observations. He has conducted numerous measurement campaigns on glaciers in different parts of the world. His missions have taken him to the Alps, the Andes, the Himalayas and as far as Antarctica. His research work focuses on the study of mass balances and glacier dynamics. An important part of its activity concerns the analysis of hazards related to the evolution of glaciers. His work is internationally recognized through more than 80 scientific publications and several books for the general public, and is part of the IGE (Institute of Geosciences of the Environment)

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  • WYNS Robert

    Robert Wyns holds a PhD in structural geology (Pierre and Marie Curie University) and has been a geologist at the Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières since 1981. He participated in the survey of the geological map of France in the Paris basin and then in the Armorican Massif, before leaving for the Middle East and Saudi Arabia. He has also worked on mining (France, Saudi Arabia) and oil projects (Madagascar) and has participated in numerous research projects. Since 1995, its activity has focused mainly on rock alteration processes and the characterization of their physical properties, through scientific research projects and applications, particularly in support of public policies. He has developed methods for mapping and modelling these properties, particularly in the context of altered basement. It is at the origin of the discovery of the fissured horizon in the deep part of the lateritic profiles and its link with alteration processes. Together with his hydrogeological colleagues, in particular Patrick Lachassagne and Benoît Dewandel, he contributed to the development of the modern concept of the stratiform basement aquifer and its validation in different countries or continents (Europe, South Korea, India, Burkina Faso, Guinea, Madagascar, Guyana, New Caledonia...). In addition to his research and public policy support activities, he has been teaching in several universities and engineering schools for the past twenty years, and leads a training course dedicated to the alteration of rocks and their applications within the BRGM.

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  • ZACCAI Edwin

    Edwin Zaccai holds a PhD in environmental sciences, a civil engineering physicist and a degree in philosophy. Professor at the Université Libre de Bruxelles, he heads the Centre d'Etudes du Développement Durable (CEDD), which he founded in 1997. He was also a lecturer at Sciences Po Paris.

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